6

Google Earth exists for precisely this purpose: overlaying your own data on a map. You simply write scripts to translate (or export) your data into KML format then add the URL to Google Earth like so: With regard to terms of use: the terms of use for Google Earth only forbid you to use the software to control the behavior of your vehicle, not to represent ...


5

I'd summarize my read of both of those as: Don't use our logic to provide turn by turn navigation to vehicles Don't use our maps for business asset tracking unless you've signed a commercial use agreement Hard to tell if your use case described violates either of these terms. In any case, check out http://www.openstreetmap.us/.


4

A very informative way to visualize the effect of measurements (for me) is to plot the state of the robot (mean, with covariance ellipse) before and after each measurement. Then, take the individual components of the measurement (bearing, range for AR markers), and apply them separately to get a feel for it. To do this: I use one or more of these functions ...


3

It's a limitation in Gazebo's ability to convert URDF to SDF, Gazebo's native object description format. Frustratingly, RViz works the other way around: it correctly parses URDF colors, but not the SDF fragments inserted by the gazebo tag. One tip though, instead of inlining your material definitions inside links, it's better to define them once at the ...


3

So the doc's were out of date. I just updated them as the mesh is actually of type voxblox_msgs::MeshBlock. Voxblox use to output a standard MarkerArray, however this form of visualization means you have to output the entire mesh every time any part of it changes. This meant when running on a robot and visualizing on a laptop we were saturating our wifi ...


2

It looks like you're missing the angle that the robot is currently looking, e.g. robot_angle_radians. Once you know where the robot is looking, you just use the atan2 function (see also: example usage) on each point: point_angle = Math.atan2(dy, dx); // in radians Then you want to check whether the angle is not more than 30° off of the robot's angle: ...


2

Assuming you have solved the inverse kinematics (IK) problem already... I suppose you have a transformation matrix for each joint, build up from one line in the DH table (if you used DH to describe the robot). Form the IK you have obtained $Q = [q_1, q_2, q_3, q_4, q_5, q_6]$ Having all Q values you can now write: $H_{0,1} = A_1(q_1)$ $\Rightarrow$ $H_{...


2

There seems to be two questions in one: How should I visualise the trajectory (planned and traversed paths)? How should I combine "ultrasonic sensors, infrared sensors, camera, human sensors etc. " into path planning? Also, I didn't get how obstacle avoidance is working 'well' (if it is binary obstacle or a gradient based obstacle marking probability ...


2

And the forward kinematics function has a second output argument which is an array of the transforms for each frame. The following code will do what you want: p560.plot(qz) [T,A] = p560.fkine(qz); hold on for i=1:6 trplot(A(i), 'frame', num2str(i)) end


2

Yes you can visualive it in matlab, using robot toolbox for Matlab here. Visualization would look like this And code example for MDH table for my 6 DOF Serial manipulator : a = 40/1000; b = 81/1000; c = 130/1000; d = 18/1000; e = 166/1000; f = 31/1000; g = 95/1000; p = SerialLink([... Revolute('d',b,'a',0,'alpha',0,'modified');... Revolute('d',0,'a',a,'...


1

I've never used ROS or Gazebo before, but it looks like all of your components are defined as being part of the same link, so Gazebo may be applying the last-specified color to all components because, as the documentation is written, The link element describes a rigid body with an inertia, visual features, and collision properties. Describes A rigid ...


1

I had this problem too. You just have to source the corresponding setup.bash for the terminal that runs rviz and the /voxblox_node/mesh topic will be available to show in rviz.


1

The easiest way to do this would be to use the trplot function (documented for v9 at http://www.petercorke.com/RTB/r9/html/trplot.html). You can simply call this function with the transformation matrices for each link and it will add frame axes in those locations.


1

You can plot the 2 and 3 σ gates around the means to see if it visually and intuitively makes sense. If you have access to the raw data before it was filtered, you can calculate the residuals and follow how to plot $\pm 3 \sigma$ of a landmark in EKF-SLAM


1

I'm sure you've tried this, but if you follow the links in that YouTube video, you'll see that its author has posted the source code. See: Gait tracking with x-IMU, and; Github: xioTechnologies/Gait-Tracking-With-x-IMU Yes, it's written in MATLAB, but "for anything MATLAB can do, there's a corresponding Python library". :) In particular, you might ...


1

Surface properties like that are really only for cosmetic purposes so it is unlikely any CAD program has that option. However, you may be able to get the appropriate effect by assigning particular faces either glass or mirror texture. Based on your added comments, I think the best option is simply to capture images or animation frames with whatever proper ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible