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Generally, for small movements (or steps), most servos are torque limited to prevent overshoot and oscillations. If you change the input pulse timing by 20uS, the motor will not reach full torque before it starts braking the motor to stop. The motor torque is also throttled at the end of the desired motion to prevent overshoot of the target position. Even ...


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The answer is $\vec{G}$! and also any $\vec{\tau}$ torque caused by it, if the axis connecting the geometrical center of the sensor (assuming it measures torques relative to its geometrical center) to the centre of gravity of the gripper. $\vec{G} = m * \vec{g}$ where $m$ is the mass of the gripper, $g$ is the gravitational ACCELERATION, not force and G is ...


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You're right that each spinning prop creates both a force and a torque. The force is created opposite the direction of the flowing air; each action has an equal and opposite reaction. The same way you can push away from a wall by pushing onto it, the propeller pushes "away" from the air (up) by pushing the air down. That same force also exerts a ...


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Each motor generates torque to spin it's fan. As the fan turns, the quadrotor will experience the same torque on the frame, only in the opposite direction. This is similar to a helicopter - the tail rotor is needed to counteract the torque from the main engine. If the tail rotor fails, the helicopter will start to rotate in the opposite direction from ...


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