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First, ensure that your wiring is consistent with the wiring diagram on p. 24-25. I've seen similar "random" behavior when the grounds are not connected properly. Before attempting to programmatically talk to the pump, try it manually. I use TeraTerm to talk to my Harvard 33 during testing - but any like terminal software will do (even Hyperterminal). ...


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I don't know how it would be specifically in Python, but generally speaking, when you open a file, you get a handle which you may possibly write to or read from. Again, generally speaking, the read and write system calls return the number of bytes they have read or written. In your case, you are writing "VER\r" to serial port. You get 4 because all four ...


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ser.write is always returning number of bytes written. It is not the response to your command. In order to get the response, you need to perform a read command.


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Communication latency is another reason why USB1.1 or USB2.0 is not always a good replacement for RS232. Data on USB1.1 or USB2.0 bus is formatted into 1ms or 125us frames respectively, which forces minimum receive to transmit latency equal to two frame periods (often more in practise). This is an important consideration for modern PC hardware, which usually ...


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Firstly, the Arduino IDE already uses the AVR GCC compiler. Put another way, all of your Arduino (.ino) code gets transformed into a C++ (ie .cpp) file and then gets compiled with AVR GCC. The easiest way to move to Atmel/Visual Studio is to use Visual Micro. It is a great product, the documentation is good and the transition is almost seamless. To migrate ...


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I never worked with Arduino, but there is a lot going on behind the scenes in the Arduino Serial class. The examples below should get you started, its not supposed to be compilable or functional as a whole. The example is for UART0. Serial.begin() performs the low level initialization. If you do this manually it will look something like this: void ...


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Thank you for directly linking to the manual -- that makes answering questions like this much quicker. I connected the instrument to my computer using a D-sub/USB conversion dongle. I'm assuming that you've already figured out that the thing that looks like a standard 9-pin D-sub connector on the Harvard Model 33 is completely incompatible with ...


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This is a much bigger project than you think, and processing power is the least of your concerns. You may want to skip straight to step #9. Otherwise, here are some questions you need to ask yourself, based on my experience of building something very similar as a hobby project (I used a desktop PC for processing): 1: Exactly how far should the robot reach? ...


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