2

Look in CommandCallback, where you set "stop = True". That sets a local variable, not the global variable you intended. Declare the variable to be global by preceding the assignment with the declaration "global stop". This contrasts with reading a global variable, which just works without declaring it (notably, in PathScanning). It might ...


2

With consideration cheap, strong enough, not ugly and easy to shape, then my recommendation is you can use clipboard. I have seen people win international robotic competition with robot made using clipboard. So this idea worth to try. Figure 1. Clipboard


1

There can be a few explanations for this: Does your motor controller (ESC) have an on-off switch? If so, try flipping that Some ESCs need to "arm". Try going to full throttle and back and see if that makes a difference I'm assuming you have your battery plugged in ;-) Try reversing the direction in the myconfig.py file


1

These battery charging messages are normal when the battery is charging. What happens when you take the robot off the charger? Have you tried putting the robot into safe mode (b'\x80\x83') before sending commands? Have you tried either of the scripts on the iRobot STEM github repo? Please note that I'm an iRobot employee but the postings on this site are my ...


1

Use a distance threshold between the wall and robot and make the robot turn every time the output of sensor is less than the threshold. I guess you are using a differential drive robot. And if you are not mapping, there is no use of other 2 sensors. You just need to create a publisher for the sensor data and subscribe it to calculate the threshold and send ...


1

The Realsense sensors are reasonable to use on indoor autonomous robots. "Affordable" is subjective, so I've left it out of my above response. And if you want to use it make sure that you have enough compute capability and USB bus available to stream the data coming off the sensors. Depending on your use case and settings, smaller processors like ...


1

I know that this is an old post but I found it when searching to understand why my motor wasn't working. I finally found the solution to my problem so I thought that I'd post it in case anyone else runs into it in the future. I lost hours to this issue. I'd run a very similar program on an arduino and it worked fine - I couldn't work out why it wasn't ...


1

The Argon One case has a USB 3.0 M.2 adapter for the raspberry pi 4. So, you could use an SSD instead of an SD card, if that is where you're having issues. https://www.argon40.com/argon-one-m-2-case-for-raspberry-pi-4.html


1

The Lithium polymer and Lithium ion batteries are a staple for this sort of robotics rig. They produce voltage levels in multiples of 3.7-4.2v. You’ll need at least a 2-cell series (2S). Since your control circuitry will require logic-level voltages, you’d use a Buck converter to take the battery output down to 5v for the Pi and Arduino. 1A and 3A modules ...


1

For arduino and raspberry, powerbank is enough to power them for several hours. But the only problem i ever face when using powerbank is they sometime auto turn off because how little arduino current draw. For dc motor, use lipo or any equvalent battery. So you would have enough power to move your wheels and make your robot have better mobility.


1

0.5mm 1x2m^2 sheet metal @ your local hardware store ~ 2EUR metal cutting pliers ~ 4EUR being able to cut it, fold it, punch* it for ventilation - priceless * use a nail and hammer/stone; rest on a disposable plank; punch from out to in; protect any PCBs, motors and especially wires inside from the jagged edges or neutralise those with a file or sillicone


1

Cardboard on top of a cheap robot chassis can be quite effective. See this version of Openbot that does not use a 3d printer: https://custom-build-robots.com/raspberry-pi-robot-cars/openbot-your-smartphone-controls-a-robot-car-introduction/13860?lang=en I will typically use hobby-board plywood as a base and cardboard as a second layer. Get the hobby-board ...


1

If you want to build a robot with lots of moving parts, or just a dedicated, aluminum building medium, and dont have a tight budget, you can use Actobotics building parts, from servo city.com (https://www.servocity.com/actobotics/) They are metal pieces with holes, so you can attach screws, other Actobotics pieces, servos, motors, and they even have mounts ...


1

Consider things like food storage containers, dishpans, and household storage bins. Some (HDPE?) ones are reasonably stiff yet compliant, and you can readily cut them. Beware the beautiful, crystal-clear ones that are hard and brittle. If you're in the US, take a walk through your local Target or Walmart, and see whether some Rubbermaid or Tupperware shapes ...


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