6

Ironic answer: you do not need any channel, but your quadcopter will just hover stationary :) Practical answer: The throttle controls translation on the vertical axis. This allows you to gain or loose altitude. Depending on how the quadcopter is programmed you may control the vertical acceleration or the vertical speed (aka autolevel mode). The rudder ...


5

I'm the author of the question you refer to and I will tell you; it is in fact possible. But unfortunately not easy. There is quite some heavy development going on now, since it seems to be the next promis of wind energy. This is because at higher altitudes, winds are stronger and more constant. In addition to that, there is no need for large constructions (...


5

specific answers; yes that controller will work fine, and is pretty popular. No it does not need anything additional other than to be hooked up to the receiver. from it, you hook up four speed controllers, and to them 4 motors. yes that transmitter receiver will work, but it is a little on the 'too inexpensive' side. You do realize it requires hooking it ...


4

We have used an older generation of that board in our lab. It takes it's commands via RC which means you would not need another microcontroller. It is only a hover controller however so if you want to do any autonomy you will need another solution. One possibility is to use an Arduino and an Xbee to replace the RC system and use your computer to control it....


3

At a guess this is either a Hall Effect, or Optical, speed and direction measurement device. The five wires will be GND, and outputs of Sensor1 and Sensor 2, and the other two would be the power supply to the Hall Effect/Optical Sensor (with there being a separate Vcc or GND for the power). This is a basic schematic for a Hall Effect based device This is a ...


3

As I understand it, the flight control board allows you to control your Quadcopter using a standard 5 or 6 channel RC receiver. So you don't need any other equipment. The radio controller you suggested is 6 channel, so that's plenty. The flight control board just provides stability, as it would be almost impossible for a human to control the speeds of all ...


3

I read a magazine article many months ago about an automated system of power generation for isolated areas like disaster relief and such where a kite was used instead of a propeller driven wind turbine. The write-up was not particularly technical but there was a picture of the ground unit and it looked like a winch with a boom like a fishing rod or ...


3

Of course it's possible. Here's how I would try it out. This would work best if the kite had some sort of sensor on it. GPS would work, but better would be some sort of local GPS function. This would allow the robot to know where the kite was easily. It would also be helpful to have a rate sensor to give a better overall picture of what is happening. The ...


3

There are standard protocols, and then there are proprietary protocols. The choice of what protocol to use depends on many things. Without listing the precise set of flight controllers you are planning to buy, it's difficult to provide anything more than a very general answer to this question.


2

If I'm understanding your architecture (from joystick to UAV) correctly, it is this: ${[\text{joystick}]-\text{wires}- \atop [\text{RPi}]-\text{USB HID}-}-[\text{Nano}]-\text{XBee}-[\text{UAV}]$ You're considering laying it out like this: $[\text{joystick}]-\text{wires}-[\text{Nano}]-\text{USB HID}-[\text{Rpi}]-\text{USB HID}-[\text{Nano}]-\text{XBee}-[\...


2

The Arduino Nano should be able to interface with the XBee no problem. If all you are using the Arduino for is forwarding a message that comes from the RPi, you might as well just use an XBee Explorer board (basically a FTDI Chip with a socket fit for an XBee). After configuration, all you need to do is to write to a serial port to get the XBee to send a ...


2

After some conversations with Microhard's technical support, the following procedure worked for me: Email Microhard technical support. Explain what you're trying to do, and ask for a version of 920 series firmware that will communicate with your 910 series modem. This firmware is available for the n920 via email, but is not on their website. There is a ...


2

Search for a Digital Potentiometer. It's exactly what you're looking for. Just replace the manual pot's with them and you can use serial connections to control the voltage.


2

In this case, you can think of a "channel" as a "linear control" -- a single-dimensional value. For example, throttle can go from 0%-100% (or -100% to 100% if you're doing some really crazy things); roll, pitch, and yaw are expressed as a range of degrees. The RC transmitter you refer to has 2 joysticks, each with 2 dimensions, for a total of 4 channels ...


2

You have two channels on each stick. Commonly throttle and yaw on the left stick and pitch and roll on the right.


2

You are confused by the "channels" term here. The resource you are linking to is talking about "conventional" remote control, using it's own frequency and it's own protocol, not compatible with WiFi in any way. In this case the term "channel" means just a specific radio frequency the control is operating. When talking about WiFi, the channels are frequencies ...


2

How far is it in kilometers? What radio frequency you can use? Do you need security (code the data)? It strongly depends on your application, it seems you need a real-time connection (to control a robot). In practice you can use an infrastructure such as telephony systems, GPRS or if you have enough resources you can use satellite solutions. Another ...


2

I am, unfortunately, not going to address your entire question but, rather, focus on the frequency used for communications. Why do you say: because the frequency for these are 2.4 GHz By these, do you mean the Pi, Arduino or Galileo? These boards are not confined to using 2.4 GHz. The reason 2.4 GHz is so popular is that it is one of the bands that ...


2

If you are looking at automatic control, consider using a radio modem instead of RC transmitter/receiver. One example. These are often used on hobby drones for relaying telemetry and control via ground station software. The Pixhawk is a drone flight computer that works well for this. Designed by researchers, there are lots of inputs and a couple different ...


2

Spectrum licensing There are only a limited number of frequencies in unlicensed bands which can be used for radio control, and different countries have different licensed bands for different uses. For instance: 35MHz is available for RC use in many countries in Europe, but other countries use a whole variety of other frequencies below 100MHz. I found a ...


2

As I suspect you found out (based on your other question 7169), doing both over the same RF link will be more truble than it is worth, You could use ip as you sujested but this might turn out to be more truble than it is worth unless your main controller is a raspberry pi or BBB that already has native networking. I am assuming you are talking about a ...


2

There is a product from Pololu called the Wixel. In a classroom environment, when one of them transmits a signal all of the others will receive the message. The radio interconnections between the wixels are essentially just like serial communications. It wouldn't be too much work to bash together a protocol that can either 'broadcast' to all devices in the ...


2

With a conventional RC vehicle, I would probably suggest getting your own receiver-transmitter set (something like XBEE transceivers or similar) and completely gutting the original system, but with a small quadcopter like you have, I think trying to replace the receiver would be very difficult to do while maintaining the aerodynamics of the vehicle. You ...


2

If I'm understanding you correctly, you are saying that the motors spin, but they don't spin fast enough to generate enough thrust to get the drone off the ground. It sounds to me, if this is the case, that you maybe haven't done the speed calibration for the electronic speed controllers (ESCs). Here is the Hobbywing page on calibration, if you are using ...


1

Unfortunately I don't have enough rep to comment or I would do that instead of a full blown answer. I think Rf modules would be the way to go in this situation, I have played around with this trans/recv pair before and had pretty good results, however I don't think the range would quite be enough for your setup. With regards to you mentioning 16 robots ...


1

You can use a magnetic clutch. When the strain on the horn passes a particular mark, it overpowers the pairs of magnets holding the clutch plates causing it to slip without damaging the gears. You can easily make them, and here is a company selling them http://robosavvy.com/store/dagu-magnetic-servo-clutches-for-miniature-servos.html If you want to use an ...


1

This would be a hack, but you could add a small amount of weight to it so the tick that makes the quad ascend slightly would now be the hover tick.


1

You can use high power(1W) radio modems such as digi XTend or RFD900 for controlling your robot. For video transmission you can use high power analog video modules. Using proper directional antennas such as patch antennas or helical antennas, you can easily go up to 20+ km in line of site.


1

The 3DR radios by default use 57600 baud, be sure that it is set properly on both the sending and receiving side, this has been the source of many problems for me.


1

Since your frame is about (530g + other parts' weight), you need to make sure that your 4 motors give you a combined thrust of at least 100 g more than, just to get off the ground and maneuver. Anything greater than that is good. (Thrust Calculator). You battery amps * burst C / constant C should be greater than the motor amp pull * 4. Propellers look OK. ...


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