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5

If you want to focus on the software only, then Mindstorms are a great start. Because you have a fixed platform and do not need to care a lot about the hardware. And if you want to mount some homebrew sensors this is also possible. The mindstorms itself are well documented and the hardware/software interfaces are relatively easy. You can do some stuff by ...


2

Have you taken a look at LeJOS? It's a port of the Java VM and SDK to the various Lego MINDSTORMS robot kits. The Lego kits themselves are quite capable as hobbyist robotics kits go, I bought the NXT version years ago and had a lot of fun with it. The newest EV3 kit has a powerful ARM CPU and an SD card reader for loading software, it looks like a good ...


1

Another alternative are robots based on the Raspberry Pi or Arduino microcontrollers. The Pi4J library implements convenient API's for accessing Raspberry Pi I/O's, while the JArduino distribution enables controlling Arduino boards from Java over a serial or Bluetooth connection. You can search for "arduino robot kit" or "raspberry pi robot ...


1

there seems to be no mature drone platform focused on the NN research personally I suggest using a drone combines a NUC, TX2 for example the drone works as a flying platform providing control APIs, and a gimble system if possible the vision system can be constructed by NUC, you can put your own camera on it and do your NN research for this design, you ...


1

I played quite a lot with the lego mindstorms and indeed they are interesting but I found them quite limited at the ARM level. The other point with them is that when you move to another Core like the raspberry which I find more interesting (but I am a developper) is that you can continue using the lego parts with it. So depending where you want to focus on, ...


1

You might also try the CoroBot by CoroWare. It can be used outdoors, but is much smaller than the Husky. Edit: Unfortunately, CoroWare seems to be out of business now.


1

TL;DR: the Clearpth Husky is a solid machine that will pull it's weight, but expect to get a few laughs from their complete lack of quality control. I can speak to the Clearpath Husky since my lab has two of them and I've worked with them quite a bit. It's a solid vehicle, great for mounting sensors on, works well indoors and outdoors. On the software side, ...


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