7

If this is true linear motion (non-rotational) then you will need some sort of a pivoting linkage in between the two units to transfer one motion to the other. Something like this would probably work: As the lower link moves vertically, it rotates the red gear which in turn pushes the second link horizontally. However, given that your image shows more of a ...


4

I think a more compact and reliable solution would be to use a third shaft that is perpendicular to the other two (on the Z-axis) Given the shaft moving up/down is moving on the Y-axis and the shaft moving left/right is moving on the X-axis. This crude diagram should explain things better. As the motor turns Shaft A upwards it then turns Shaft C. Shaft C ...


4

The mechanism suggested in the previous answer is a form of four-bar linkage. A bell crank is a slightly simpler form of basically the same thing. You could push on one side of a bell crank with the end of the motor shaft, and use a spring return for the other direction if it is difficult to attach to the shaft. (The shaft apparently rotates, but the ...


3

Scott-Russell type mechanism. For weeks I was trying to come up with a solution for that exact problem for a engineering project mine. Look it up.


3

Non of the commercial air bearings I've seen have attempted to seal like this, so I think that your problems with vibration may lie elsewhere. The problems I have seen with air-bearing systems have been related to mechanical over constraint. A high performance linear bearing stage I once worked on used six bearings like these: Arranged in 3 pairs like ...


2

Your setup is prone to binding because of the physical arrangement. You have the leadscrew on one side and the bearing on the other, so the leadscrew is unevenly supported. I would put the leadscrew in the middle, with rails on either side. Then, instead of a bearing, I would use bushings, which you could just epoxy in place. How prone to jamming this is ...


2

From the sound of it you require smooth continuous operation in this application. To guarantee this you can use a bearing (cheap $3-5 USD ebay bearings would be fine unless you have non-trivial load needs). In your case the load is radial. Depending which bearing you use, you can get around 20 degrees of misalignment (depending on fit and material) before ...


2

This is a great problem to hone mechanism design skills on. There is a set of dimensions for which this mechanism works fine. The condition for this is that the contact of each rod & hole, including the drive screw, remain on the correct side of the friction cone, for all free motion and bending of the elements. You can start thinking about this by ...


2

If you want to build something that more or less resembles CNC machine, and use a pen as a tool and draw some pictures, then you will probably be fine (as long as you can do programming and have a lot of patience to do calibration). Why is this not a common solution? Usually you want CNC to be precise and to have enough power to move a tool at reasonable ...


2

CNC controllers, in most cases, control rotary motion and the model of how this rotary motion is tranformed, by the mechanism attached to the motor, to a translational motion is implemented in the controller. You can use any method of transforming rotary motion to a linear motion as long as the model for it is pre-implemented in the CNC controller or you ...


1

Instead of a threaded rod and a non-threaded rod, use two threaded rods (i.e. replace the red rod in your diagram with a threaded rod) and drive them both from the same motor. You're basically building a twin screw vise. You can also do this with gears:


1

Another, similar, configuration is a linear actuator along the center axis of the plate with two guide rails one on both side of the plate. As said by @Chuck this would help with alignment. There are many DC actuators, such as Actuonix Motion Devices (formerly Firgelli Technologies) here. Instead of DC motor, you can use stepper linear actuators such ...


1

I've cleaned the bearings of residue using dimethoxymethane aerosol and lubricated them with PTFE-based oil lubricant. It works pretty well now. More details here.


1

I think you might need two "lazy susans" in the channel. Shown in green in this image. And then the rider in the channel does not have to be round. In fact it is probably best to rigidly attach to one side of the lazy susan. Now you can put a simple shaft and bearing in the inside ring. One more note, if the load is not great, and you don't care about ...


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