Hot answers tagged

4

If it's your first time, better off try with a simulator to check that your program doesn't break the robot's constraints or security configurations. The most powerful simulator I came across is "V-REP", which is free for educational purposes. V-REP is the Swiss army knife among robot simulators: you won't find a simulator with more functions, features,...


2

Kuka robots have the axis positive and negative side clearly marked on them. Use these to define the orientations of the Z-axes assigned to the joints. With other words, try to reverse engineer the DH parameters used by Kuka. Only this way can you corelate your DH table with the kuka axis orientations. If the axis moves in the wrong direction it means that ...


2

If you are working with windows then for KUKA programs you can use the (OrangeEdit), check it in this website, OrangeEdit Beta. It is free and it enables you to view and edit all the .src and .dat files and more. As for the robot program itself, usually you can save it in a USB key, to do so you just log into the KCP of the robot as administrator (default ...


1

Debugging this situation can be done pretty easily - or at least you can easily narrow down the possible problems. First, plug the joint angles you received from your inverse kinematics algorithm into your forward kinematics equations. Do they provide the same end effector coordinates that you entered into your inverse kinematics routine? If not, ...


1

If Kuka does not specify the damping ratio, then on remaining option is determining it experimentally. You can excite the structure (e.g. with an excitation hammer) and measure the vibration response (e.g. using accelerometers). Please note that you might need to measure in different poses to compute damping for different joint and to see sensibility to ...


1

There is the official option which you can by from Kuka. It is called Kuka Office. I am not sure about variable suggestions, but this can be used for debugging. There is also orange edit (currently in free beta) which many Kuka programmers use. This does have variable suggestions and also suggestions for methods/variables available in the Kuka language. ...


1

The Kuka KRC4 Controller can be programmed using the KRL language. This official Kuka manual gives a good introduction to both basics of hardware and software. KRL is a high level programming language which runs on a mixed Windows-VxWorks environment.


1

This is a limitation of DH notation. Axis rotation follows the right-convention about the z-axis. For the first joint you are stuck with rotation about the world z-axis, hence your problem. For the Robotics Toolbox joint rotation all follow the right-hand convention. You could multiply your joint angle vector by a vector of rotation directions dir = [-1 ...


1

I assume you are working with a KRC4 or KRC2 controller since you have mentioned OrangeEdit. In order give your robot motion reference values you will need a technology packet called RSI Interface. This allows you to transmit ethernet packets to the controller and give new motion references with a 12 ms cylcetime. All you have to do is generate the ...


1

In school (about 8 years ago) I did some work with a Kuka KR 5 sixx robot arm. I remember there being 2 different APIs. One was pretty high-level and you could specify joint configurations, waypoints, etc. through XML over TCP at some slow rate (maybe 10 Hz). They also provided a more powerful low-level interface, but I forget the specifics of that. I ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible