2

This is a good question, and one you should definitely consider when designing a new robot arm. But unfortunately, it depends a lot on the configuration of your arm (i.e. how the joints will be bent), and how you determine "best" (i.e. are you optimizing for speed, strength, dexterity, etc). And even if you know these things, the metrics you use to ...


2

If you have the Jacobians from joint velocities to link body velocities (you can calculate these by taking each link $i$ as if it were the end effector and calculating its body Jacobian $J^{b}_{i}$), then you can get the mass matrix for each link with respect to the joint angles as the transpose of the link's Jacobian multiplied by the link's mass and ...


2

Considering your apparent education background, I’m surprised at this question... But regardless. Working with robots, when compared to making robots are very different things. This is not so much different than driving cars and fixing them compared to designing and building them. As you studied physics, then you’re well aware that physics is the ...


1

If the rotation looks right but translation look deviated, noise might be an issue. Usually rotations are more robust to noise than translations when using the calibration equations. Synthetic data might be a good choice to debug.


1

You need inverse kinematics. Which refers to calculating the joint angles so that the robot will reach a particular pose. You can not simply move from point A to point B.. You will need to use inverse kinematics to calculate all the positions the arm will pass thru to form a straight line.


1

Those two papers have a different equation for the same robot because they have taken different assumption. The first paper has considered the centre of mass to be at the end of the link, and the other paper has considered the centre of mass at the middle of the link. Now the dynamics of any two-link manipulator irrespective of the link shape is $$ \tau ...


1

Arduino and RPI can take the role of control systems hardware. They are not what someone would call industrial grade (although, in some cases, they are used in industrial context). It is hard to define what industrial grade means, it is in many cases subjective, but here are some aspects which I think are mostly agreed upon: Hardware and Software ...


1

You write down the kinematics of your robot as a series of simple transforms, translations and rotations. In MATLAB this would be: >> s = 'Rz(q1) Tz(L1) Tx(L2) Ry(q2) Tz(L3) Ry(q3) Tz(L4) Tx(L5) Rx(q4) Tx(L6) Ry(q5) Tx(L7) Rx(q6)'; in words: rotate about the z-axis by q1, translate in the z-direction by L1, translate in the x-direction by L2, rotate ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible