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I think this is a great question. The two basic options are make it yourself or have someone else make it. EDIT: check the bottom for a third option... Make it yourself To make it yourself you need to choose a material and manufacturing process for the part, then acquire the material and skills needed. (Usually people select a process they know how to do ...


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First, it is important to understand the differences between the Arduino and the Raspberry Pi. You can read more here and here. The Arduino is a microcontroller. It is a specialized board that handles low level, often repetitive tasks like reading a sensor or controlling a motor with a motor driver. The Raspberry Pi is a complete Linux computer that ...


2

I have used both KVH CNS-5000 and the Xsens MTi-G-710 that do what you are asking. Both these products provide on-board sensor fusion. The CNS-5000 uses an EKF and I am not sure about the Xsens. They both cost in excess of $4k. I am unaware of any less costly solutions that integrate both the GNSS and IMU.


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Will it cause hardware problems? Theoretically, no. This is done quite often, so there is no inherent limitation there. If you design the board badly on the other hand, well that's just bad design! Using multiple microcontrollers is a great thing, because it lets you parallelize your tasks and can make life a lot easier on that front. However, with that ...


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Missing a few information, so I will assume the following: - Using the instruction analogWrite() to send pulses to the ESC. - Not using the Mega pin 4 or 13. - your map() instruction is converting from your receiver pulse length to your analogWrite() function. ESC require a pulse between 1000uS and 2000uS. Therefore, analogWrite(160) is about a 1280uS ...


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The other option would be a laser. The baloon could reach migher altitudes without the corresponding increase in wire weight. Of course, it would need some means of holding position. Which it might need anyway - a blimp, for example, will need to be flown actively against a storm when tethered. Obviously, the baloon needs to be made of some material which ...


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I too was a beginner (and to a large extent still am very much so) so I will share my experience with you, as maybe it might help you find your own path and avoid my mistakes! Caveat first for background - this is more about the construction then the coding as my robot was radio controlled and had no built in intelligence. However it was built from scratch ...


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A robot that can accept voice commands and travel to a specified location, do something, and then return is not trivial. The robot you are suggesting is a rather advanced robot for a beginner. I would suggest starting with just a basic robot that can move and avoid objects. Once you get that down I would try each of your objectives one by one in a new robot. ...


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