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6

I think this is a very relevant question for robotics, as you can spent a lot of time fixing your system if something went wrong in this area. Here are a few things to look out for: Insulation: Ideally you don't want any high voltages to reach your equipment in the first place. So one of the most important rules we apply to our electronics is insulate. Try ...


4

I'm in agreement with @movrev but wanted to expand beyond the scope of a comment. RN-42 is slick. I'm coding for it now, and I think it is an excellent BT choice. Low cost and multiple receivers (switches) appear to be mutually exclusive. You might consider the RN-42 as a BT receiver to preserve smartphone interface. Then, you might consider an 802.15 (...


3

At a guess this is either a Hall Effect, or Optical, speed and direction measurement device. The five wires will be GND, and outputs of Sensor1 and Sensor 2, and the other two would be the power supply to the Hall Effect/Optical Sensor (with there being a separate Vcc or GND for the power). This is a basic schematic for a Hall Effect based device This is a ...


3

Your scenarios are correct. You can connect multiple solar cells together to get increased current or increased voltage. Wire them in series (positive to negative) to boost voltage, wire them in parallel (positives to positive) to boost current capacity. As a final note, I would caution running near the maximum capacity of the solar cell. The voltage of ...


3

use circuit breakers. That is the route I go. I really like the following: Allen Bradely 1492-ghXXX where XXX is the amp rating. Ex: a 4 amp fuse would be 1494-gh040, and a 10 amp 1494-gh100. they are slim profile, but are expensive as hell (as if sold by Lucifer himself - $120CAD!!!). Try to find cheap ones on Amazon or ebay. Another manufacturer, whose ...


3

The question is a bit vague, but I would say that you at least need to spend ~$16 in a Bluetooth receiver. I have experience with roving networks modules, such as the RN42, which are easy to set up as wireless serial ports (you can talk to them via pyserial or the like).


3

We evaluated a variety of options and settled on Altium Designer at our shop. We build nothing but robots with a team of 9 engineers. I am not sure there is a ton of stuff that is robotic specific in a PCB design, but Altium allows us to interface directly with our Pick and Place machine, easily generate 3D models, and the integration of the library with ...


3

The answer is on page 2 of the datasheet. The minimum "Input High Voltage" is listed as "70% × VS". Therefore, if you supply voltage (VS) is 5V, the minimum specified input voltage would be 3.5V. This value is for operation over the entire specified temperature range. It MAY work with 3.3V inputs (probably unreliably), but it would be better to convert the ...


2

This is not a trivial problem to solve. Assuming your DXF file contains various primitives like tracks and pads drawn out, you need to create an algorithm which draws cuts around them, to end up with a PCB something like this: This is known as PCB isolation routing, and is in itself is non-trivial because (I assume) the tracks and pads will overlap in ...


2

I assume you know (or can figure out) how to parse the line objects in the dxf file, and can convert them to straight line operations in g-code. So the basic problem is how to order the operations to minimize time (which is the same as unnecessary travel). This sounds like a variant of the Travelling Salesman Problem. Except instead of visiting nodes, ...


2

Will it cause hardware problems? Theoretically, no. This is done quite often, so there is no inherent limitation there. If you design the board badly on the other hand, well that's just bad design! Using multiple microcontrollers is a great thing, because it lets you parallelize your tasks and can make life a lot easier on that front. However, with that ...


2

Very simply, you can use a single pole, double throw relay. This has two outputs: one is normally open and the other is normally closed. Both will not be energized concurrently. EDIT (based on Chuck's comment): In some applications, in which turn-on and turn-off timing is critical, you need to decide between a "make before break" and a "break before make"...


1

Depending on the resolution you need, you could use a few multi-channel ADC chips. The TLC1543IN is a through-hole (would work in a breadboard) 10-bit 11-input ADC that communicates over SPI. Connect however many you need to the same SPI bus, and then wire each chip's CS (chip select) pin to a GPIO on the Xavier. Whenever a chip's CS line is held high (at ...


1

I agree with lenik first statement, you idea is totally sound. Also your grounding to not have all the current drained passing through a single 'hub' is sound as otherwise you will need this central hub to be able to handle the total current drained which would result in extra weight. The two drawbacks of your solutions that I see are as follow: changing ...


1

For that microcontroller yes, you need to program in C++. But likely it's not powerful enough to do what you want to do. You should consider using a Raspberry Pi, or doing the higher-level computations on a desktop or laptop and communicating decisions about motor control etc to the atmega over serial.


1

Answering for others with the same question... I understand the OP has long since moved on I don't disagree with the others here, but have a different take. Direct answers to your questions (with an FTC Robotics perspective in mind): Just as you need at least a minimal computer to learn programming, you will need a at least a minimal robot to learn ...


1

I agree with what @PrestonRoy regarding the academic aspects. But, there is a big learning by doing component too. The earlier you start the better. Don't wait until you "know everything you need to". JOIN A ROBOTICS TEAM AND DIVE IN! In the process of doing, you will learn a lot about what robotics is what your need to learn. Last year my ...


1

I am a graduate student whose research is applied to robotics. I recommend: Linear algebra and Calculus Basic programming skills, learn arduino and another language Electronics courses - basic electric circuits Mechanics courses - statics and dynamics Control theory - as much as you can I would recommend pursuing a degree in either electrical engineering, ...


1

All batteries have an amp-hour rating that says how much charge is in the battery. A triple A baterry and a D cell battery are both 1.5V batteries, but the D cell has a much higher amp-hour rating than a triple A. You could use the amp-hour rating directly, but what I find more useful is to get a watt-hour rating. This is more useful as robotic ...


1

It depends on how big the pull-up resistor is and how fast you want to go with I2C. If Beaglebone designates those pins as usable for I2C, the internal pull-up resistor is most likely sufficient. Generally, the smaller the pull-up resistor, the faster is the rise of the signal to 1, but when driving a 0, there is also higher consumption. To understand this ...


1

I was working on a similar project a while ago. Assuming that you are using an AUX for audio input, the best thing that I have done that seemed to work was using a TIP-31c NPN Transistor. You could also use a TIP-31a/b transistor. Here's an image on how you could connect the transistor and get the affect you are looking for: http://cdn.instructables.com/F7J/...


1

If the intention is only to have one LED glowing based on surrounding sound, use a condenser micro phone amplifier connect the output to LED, If you are doing some robotic project and already audio out put is available, you can connect LED directly with a voltage divider to avoid over voltage, also you can have an Op-Amp circuit to drive the LED.The solution ...


1

Yes, that looks like it will work. Keep in mind that the arduino io pins aren't powering any logic. Most Arduinos can provide more than 500 mA from their 5v pin assuming that they are connected to a power supply other than usb (not that you want to draw much current from it). The io pins on atmega328 based boards can provide 40 mA, so powering anything more ...


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