4

ROS will work fine for this task. It will add some additional overhead for your Raspberry Pi but it is fairly small provided you only install the Robotic or Base configuration instead of the Full configuration and are using a headless (no GUI) Raspberry Pi install. My company uses ROS on self-driving cars and ROS has, so far, never been the cause of a fault -...


4

That is called a gantry robot.


3

The system is nonlinear for acceleration. If the desired acceleration value is bigger than 0, use the throttle, if smaller than 0, use the break. Other than that, you should be fine using a cascaded control loop with an inner acceleration loop and an outer speed control loop. Despite the fact that it has a discontinuity in the acceleration control loop, you ...


3

Tough to say without knowing much about the project. More parts = more problems or potential points of failure. A simple design is typically better in that there are less things that can go wrong. If the precision you need can't be accomplished without the extra parts you may want to reconsider the design. Can you accomplish the same thing a simpler way? ...


3

Generally you would only develop a model if (as in your case), you have something that you want to control. In that case, you should start by: List the outputs that you want to control. List the inputs that you can modulate. In your case, you want to control chamber temperature and object temperature. You can modulate the chamber heater and the object ...


3

It really depends on the objects you are sorting, and the flexibility you're looking for as the system is maintained over the years. Using physical methods to sort is very reliable. Many times you can align the parts, such as by using curves, chutes, vibration, and parts feeding mechanisms. Look up vibratory bowl feeders and cap feeders for examples. ...


2

You would have to do both. It's very very challenging to move an object without using hardware, and it's incredibly hard to see the colour of a brick with hardware. You'd have to break it down into a few pieces: Hardware Shape and size (you can't detect the size and shape with a robot easily) Movement of pieces Software Color Patterns


2

1- it would be better if you use a 9 DOF IMU (gyro, accelerometer, compass) and fuse the data to get a better estimate of the state of your model airplane 2- Then I would suggest that you study what is a PID controller so that you could control the variable of interest 3- The kalman filter your dad mentioned would be used to fuse the data of the IMU (point ...


2

Simplicity is the greatest sophistication. Keep the design simple to understand, implement, debug, and maintain. Do not have too many moving parts. First, start with a simple design and build more functionality on top of it.


2

“Art is the elimination of the unnecessary.” - Pablo Picasso Many designs can meet the requirements you set. To prove it works is one phase. To optimize is another. What optimize means depends on your priorities When you understand your requirements then specs, you should consider many design philosophy points like simplicity, modularity, flexibility. I ...


2

Soloshot 2 At the beginning of a session the tag must be collocated with the pan-tilt unit (held over the camera). There is only a GPS receiver in the tag and none on the pan-tilt unit. The system measures the camera position, the starting angle, and is able to calculate the pointing angle from the updated GPS measurements of the tag. GPS accuracy varies ...


2

For an autonomous boat, you might want to look into MOOS-IVP: http://oceanai.mit.edu/moos-ivp/pmwiki/pmwiki.php?n=Main.HomePageFull. It is similar to ROS in many respects, but geared towards autonomous boats instead of land vehicles. However, both middlewares are sufficiently abstract that they can handle land or sea vehicles just fine. However I can't ...


1

You need inverse kinematics. Which refers to calculating the joint angles so that the robot will reach a particular pose. You can not simply move from point A to point B.. You will need to use inverse kinematics to calculate all the positions the arm will pass thru to form a straight line.


1

ROS's costmap_2d allows you to inflate obstacles. Typically, you inflate obstacles by at least half of the robot's width. For example: Inflated obstacles in light grey. New path in blue. Typically, occupancy grids like these are much finer resolution because they are obtained with a LIDAR sensor. The map is stored as an array in memory similar to an ...


1

The simplest solution is not to allow your A* program to make diagonal steps.


1

The other option would be a laser. The baloon could reach migher altitudes without the corresponding increase in wire weight. Of course, it would need some means of holding position. Which it might need anyway - a blimp, for example, will need to be flown actively against a storm when tethered. Obviously, the baloon needs to be made of some material which ...


1

Your picture is of linear bearings on what looks to me to be stainless steel shafting. You can also use guide rails, which use a more specialized shaft than just a rod.


1

By the word "tracks" I would assume you meant the guide rails on which the 3D printers extruder is placed on.The rods which support the movement of the extruder are smooth linear shafts. They are connected to a servo motors.Hope this helps....


1

What you are looking to produce is certainly achievable using the ROS middleware. As Joshua has already pointed out, there will be some additional overhead but this should be relatively small. It is probably worth carrying out a literature search to investigate how other Autonomous Surface Vehicles (ASVs) have incorporated ROS into their software ...


1

On the page you provided (https://soloshot.com/#features-lightbox), the technical characteristics for the tag indicate (the tag is what you need to have on you for the camera to follow you): SS Link: 2.4 GHz Wi-Fi: 802.11 b/g/n And as for the Range: Range (SS Link): 2,000 ft Range (Wi-Fi): 30 ft The 2.4 GHz is probably a data link between the tag and the ...


1

Chuck is right; you need to build a model so that you can appropriately choose your controller. Temperature control is non-trivial because the underlying dynamics are non-linear. Because heat transfer has been studied extensively (see thermodynamics), you may be able to build a decent model for your system using only existing models and parameter ...


1

I'd go for a linear axis. The cheapest version could be from a printer or you buy a small belt and two gears. A brushless DC would however fit better in this scenario. Such systems are easily faster than a normal user and easy to control.


1

Software for industrial automation is somewhat different then "general purpose" software. Your software controlling the conveyor belts will have to interact with the conveyor belts. This is through sensors (probably inductive and/or capacitive proximity sensors, maybe mechanical switches, cameras with image processing etc.). The software you write will most ...


1

"Leaving out friction I need a motor with about 0.02 Nm [of torque] and [a rated speed of] 33 rpm." No offense, but verifying your numbers based on your spec's: window width 1.4 m sliding shutter weight 25 kg max speed 0.07 m/s max acceleration 0.035 m/s^2 pulley diameter 0.04m. The max linear speed is equal to $r\omega$, where $\...


1

You are hoping to make a jukebox for SIM cards. If you can place a reasonable cap on the size of your magazine (say 50) I would use a carousel with the cards attached to the outer perifery. You would then index the disk and move the relevant SIM card under the contacts (extended from the modem) that would be loaded onto the card (and signal the SIM door ...


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