18

As far as I know, this problem hasn't been "solved." Formally, this is an online coverage problem. Coverage, because we must cover each point on the floor, and online because we do not have offline access to the map. If you are interested in the most recent results, I suggest you lookup "robotic online coverage algorithms," perhaps in google scholar (there ...


12

They are different. They are often used together, but the two are not specifically related. Artificial Intelligence is a branch of computer science that focuses on solving problems that are traditionally difficult for computers -- tasks that become exponentially or factorially more complex for each incremental increase in the input. An example of this ...


10

For testing simple algorithms, you might be able to get by with a 2D simulator. There are a few out there that I am aware of: Stage: http://playerstage.sourceforge.net/index.php?src=stage STDR: http://stdr-simulator-ros-pkg.github.io/ Stage is an older, but useful, simulator which has integration with ROS (http: //wiki.ros.org/stage_ros) which will allow ...


9

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definitely room for improvement. From How Stuff Works: From an interview ...


8

One of the key measures of any machine learning algorithm is it's ability to generalize (i.e. apply what it has learned to previously unsceen scenarios). Reinforcement learners (RL) can generalize well but this ability is in part a function of the state-space formulation in my experience. This means that if you can find the right setup then the RL learner ...


7

What the speaker said at the conference was not accurate. Perhaps they meant "our robot can't single out audio like a person can", but the statement "[robots] can't single out audio like a person can" is false. Here is a partial list of systems that can determine the source of an audio signal, and track it: Conference phones (and many cell phones), with ...


7

Neato uses an organized approach. Using SLAM and bumpers, it maps the 'current' room, perimeter first, then applies some algorithm for cleaning as efficiently as possible. I've never owned a Roomba, but given what I have read about it's algorithm, I would never switch from a neato. The Laser Range Finder in the neato is often cannabilized for robotics, as ...


6

The first thing you need to establish is the goal of the robot -- not quite clear from your question. There are two main tasks that your robot has to accomplish: discovering the shape of the clean-able area, and then cleaning it. But is the amount of dirt constant? Is dirt added constantly? Is it your goal to minimize the average time that dirt remains ...


6

In robotics, it all boils down to making the hardware(in essence, the actuator) perform the desired action. The basics of control systems tell us that the transfer function decides the relationship between the output and the input given the plant, i.e. system reacts to the latter. While purely control-based robots use the system model to define their input-...


5

Based on your problem description, both HMM (generative model) and CRF (discriminative model) will work. See this discussion for a more in-depth explanation of the two approaches: What is the difference between a Generative and Discriminative Algorithm? A suggestion: before choosing an algorithm, start by carefully looking at your numerical data, with ...


5

AI means different things to different people and encapsulates a large number of sub-domains: vision, natural language processing, knowledge representation and engineering, machine learning, etc. Many, if not all, areas of AI have applications to robotics; however, doing AI research does not mean that you directly, or in any way, work with robots. Working ...


4

I believe it simply boils down to what your robot can do. If you are for some reason restricted to moving only in 4 directions, then you connect each grid cell to 4. If you can go in 8 directions, you connect each grid cell to 8. If you can go in 6 directions, you use a honeycomb grid and connect each grid cell to 6. There is no generic answer. If you ...


4

Well, there have been many AI programs written specifically to ace IQ tests. Like this one and this one. I don't think there have been any robots (computer programs which control mechanical components) which have been administered an IQ test, but, TBH, you don't need a robot for this -- just a program. Update: looks like I'm wrong, this 2012 paper says (I'...


4

Robotics is a mixture of things like mechanical engineering, electronics engineering and software engineering! Knowing C++ is a big head start in this area! Because I strongly believe that amongst all three engineering categories software is the one thing you will spend the most time on when developing an autonomous robot. So to start, learn computer-aided ...


3

I think you are mixing the idea of BEAM robotics (why that, I prefer to not use this term), with analog electronics. Analog circuits are in major applications more fast than a micro processed one, that have a clock to process instructions. The "problem" with analogs is in part with noise, but early computers are made analog, operational amplifiers are made ...


3

If we are defining BEAM robots as ones that do not use microprocessors, and only use analog circuits, then yes I think it is possible, but not practical. A microprocessor is essentially a programmable circuit, and if we define what we want our robot to do, then we should be able to program the hardware (by building the proper circuit) without needing a ...


3

The Hungarian Algorithm should be suitable for this case. You have already generated the cost matrix that describes the cost of each measurement to each object. The algorithm determines the assignments that yield the minimum total cost. It can handle cases with more measurements that objects (false positives) and more objects than measurements (when an ...


3

Unfortunately, I have no experience with ez-b, but I have looked over the site a little bit. I do, however, have lots of Arduino experience. The program is, indeed, stored on the board's local memory. However, it is very possible to write a program that can interact with your computer. With my Arduino, I often write programs that communicate with my computer ...


3

To get relative displacement between two time instants all you need to do is integrate the values given off by the accelerometer (twice for linear displacement) and gyro (once for angular displacement). Due to measurement errors, which can many times be adequately modeled as Gaussian (you might have to estimate a bias and/or scale factor to the measurement),...


3

Regarding methodologies and tools, I recommend Chris Eliasmith's How to Build a Brain. It presents the Semantic Pointer Architecture (SPA), a cognitive model that has been realized in the open source Nengo toolkit. I have read the book's introduction and some of Eliasmith's papers, and so far the approach looks very promising.


3

I believe you are only noticing the robotic systems that get a lot of press coverage. Specialized, supervisory-controlled robotic systems are definitely not the most common. Check out this list of industrial robotic systems for quantities of general-purpose, reprogrammable, robot systems for comparison purposes. Whether or not reprogrammable industrial ...


3

You could use ROS. There's AR Drone Autonomy for well.. Parrot AR-Drones. TUM ARDrone from the Technical University of Munich, who used that with OpenCV to control a drone. You can simulate a drone using Hector. Or simply search google for quadcopter ROS


3

You need enough domain knowledge to be able to tell if someone is bullshitting you or not, to be able to determine when someone has an achievable or unachievable project idea, to be able to determine who has talent and who doesn't, etc. And money. A lot of money. Quality engineers don't work for free.


3

There are a few dimensions to being a roboticist: is knowledge of theory about robot perception (understanding the world through sensors such as cameras, signal processing and machine learning), planning(how the robot should move) and action (how things move in space, kinematics, dynamics, control theory, reinforcement learning etc.). There are a lot of ...


3

I think, it is easier to explain these areas in terms of guidance, navigation and control layers for an autonomous robot. Let's stay an autonomous robot is commanded to reach a desired goal position from where it is. Guidance (what to do): this layers computes a motion plan (a sequence of positions) that starts from the current position of the robot and ...


2

If you're looking for an inexpensive sensor, you could check out InvenSense's MPU-6000, which combines a 3-axis gyroscope and a 3-axis accelerometer. It communicates via an I2C or SPI bus with your main processor and is capable of estimating attitude when you add a magnetometer.


2

To the best of my knowledge no robot has ever been subjected to an IQ test. This is in part because the IQ test is not considered a valid test of intelligence amongst. It was originally developed as a test to determine whether any given child needed special attention in school and was later altered to apply to adults. Since then it has been shown to really ...


2

I'm not sure if you still need it, but for those who happened to google for this thread, I have made one simple version of the algorithm. Basically, it tries to build the map of the area while it cleans, and it uses the map to find the nearest unvisted node (part of the room). When it can't find any, that means the room is cleaned (or the uncleaned parts ...


2

Certainly you can. You need a firmware for the Arduino that accepts remote control commands over the COM channel. Take a look at Reflecta or Firmata. I made something like this called RocketBot for Bay Area Maker Faire 2012. This was a PC remote controlling two Arduinos which ran the motors, a pneumatic rocket launcher, plus a siren and a warning light. ...


2

It's great that you are taking an initiative in building/replicating one like EZ-Robot. I would like to add a few things which helps in building a robot: 1) Simplicity. 2) Cost Factor. By simplicity I mean choosing the right hardware that actually helps your prototype to be built faster and the testing/debugging is easier. For instance, if you choose ...


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