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4

That is called a gantry robot.


3

This depends on what you mean by "cost". If you've got your own (or access to a) 3D printer and you're just paying for raw material then you can calculate the raw material cost per cubic distance (cubic inches, cubic centimeter, whatever your preferred units are), then determine the volume of the part to be printed, then multiply the two together. ...


3

In my personal experience, I hate Google SketchUp. I Recommend that you use CAD Solidworks. Google SketchUp is not meant for gear design. In Solidworks, you are able to create gears however you may and also make it function on a three-dimensional visual on your computer screen. *I personally recommend this to you with great honestly.


2

Look at Electron Beam welding technology. Businesses like Sciaky's Additive Manufacturing have found a niche market by using 3D printing techniques in metal applications. They have a 2 min video on Youtube Specifically with GMAW you will want to use a wire with very little manganese and other "cleaner" elements. This wire will cause the formation of a ...


2

I believe this is in very active development. Here's an article with a few videos on that subject: 3D printing with metal: The final frontier of additive manufacturing The real breakthrough that has enabled 3D printing for the masses has been the laser. Spray welding is a technique that has been used for decades to build up worn motor shafts, but it is ...


2

Creating 3D models with this method is very compute intensive, 123d uses many pictures (at least 20), and examines them for feature points that are common in several pictures and by examining how they change between pictures it can help build up a 3ds point cloud which is then textured using the pictures, this is very resource intensive, and could be done by ...


2

Sounds more like a material/mechanics of materials problem to me. I'm assuming this is an FDM part, and the M3 nut is metal? The nut will have no trouble stripping this. FDM parts are far from 'full strength' parts, nearly all 3D printing is. There are too many 'spaces' inside of the print itself. This gets compounded by your design itself, since this part ...


2

Usually 3D printed objects are not 100% infill, you can easily drill PLA, however it can delaminate if you push too hard and go fluffy when hot, producing a rough surface and poor quality finish. 3D Printing is quite cheap and relatively fast, better to design your model with correct holes, the internal structure of the model will then offer better support ...


1

You can do something like what you describe in at least 2 softwares: Matlab/Simulink with the Simscape Multibody toolbox https://mathworks.com/help/sl3d/link-to-simulink-and-simmechanics-models.html inside Inventor from Autodesk (eg https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=__EjxKIsy9E ) There are many tutorials on the internet to assist you there. Unfortunately ...


1

Your picture is of linear bearings on what looks to me to be stainless steel shafting. You can also use guide rails, which use a more specialized shaft than just a rod.


1

By the word "tracks" I would assume you meant the guide rails on which the 3D printers extruder is placed on.The rods which support the movement of the extruder are smooth linear shafts. They are connected to a servo motors.Hope this helps....


1

The end-effector of the structure can do 3 translations X Y and Z translations. However more then 1 motor has to be moved in order to execute a pure translation. This means that the desired motions in cartesian space first have to be mapped to the so called joint space only afterwards can these motions be executed as desired. The function that does the ...


1

The printing head does not move in z. The table an the printed model are moving.


1

Surface properties like that are really only for cosmetic purposes so it is unlikely any CAD program has that option. However, you may be able to get the appropriate effect by assigning particular faces either glass or mirror texture. Based on your added comments, I think the best option is simply to capture images or animation frames with whatever proper ...


1

Anything's possible in the world of fabrication and computers, the question is how much time, effort, and money it will cost you. If you haven't built a 3D printer from scratch before, then it might not be a good idea to attempt this; you would have no way to tell whether any problems you experience would be caused by your own design or the existing laser ...


1

I don't know of any devices that exist for this purpose (besides devices that are not for sale, such as the MIT Media Lab's "Transform" table), but I'd imagine that the 2 most promising approaches for a homemade solution would be: Use a robot arm or X/Y table to move to each pin location and push it the desired distance -- one pin at a time. Reset the pins ...


1

One thing to watch out for is that many of the additive or extrusion-based 3D printers will leave small gaps between the beads of plastic that they lay down. Even if you polish the surface, the interior will be very poor optically. You may want to look at Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) to create a finished product that is more uniformly solid.


1

3D printing a refractive lens is possible using "printoptical technology" by LUXeXceL. It was developed for making perfectly smooth surfaces. With this technology there is no need for post-processing (grinding, polishing / coloring, etc.).


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