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You will need to provide target coordinates (x,y,z, etc) to your inverse kinematics equations. As long as they have the same scale as your DH parameters, the joint angles calculated will be the same. But since you don't know the scale factor, you don't know how to scale your inputs.


2

Creating 3D models with this method is very compute intensive, 123d uses many pictures (at least 20), and examines them for feature points that are common in several pictures and by examining how they change between pictures it can help build up a 3ds point cloud which is then textured using the pictures, this is very resource intensive, and could be done by ...


1

Surface properties like that are really only for cosmetic purposes so it is unlikely any CAD program has that option. However, you may be able to get the appropriate effect by assigning particular faces either glass or mirror texture. Based on your added comments, I think the best option is simply to capture images or animation frames with whatever proper ...


1

If the cameras are stationary it should work to use Structure from Motion (https://github.com/mapillary/OpenSfM). Failing that the cameras are stationary you could attempt to create a factor graph in gtsam to solve for the camera movement, object movement, and projections between the cameras and object. See a simple SFM setup here: https://gtsam-jlblanco-...


1

I will assume, similar to OpenCV, that each camera is a pinhole camera, so you already corrected for things like lens distortion. In this case each visible point in 3D space $(x,y,z)$ gets projected into camera coordinates using $$ \begin{bmatrix} x'_i \\ y'_i \\ z'_i \end{bmatrix} = R_i \, \begin{bmatrix} x \\ y \\ z \end{bmatrix} + \vec{t}_i, \\ u_i = \...


1

All depends on much "standards" is your robot and how much coding of the simulator you want to code. If you don't want to simulate contact the easiest way is to write down your own simulator in you favorite language, based on the underlying mathematical model of your robot. If you have access to matlab the simmechanics toolbox, can be interesting because ...


1

Is is hard to make out from the perspectives that you have included, but is seems that the matlap screenshot has a rotation of approx 45 degrees around the global z axis. Taking a look at the grid in the unitz screenshot it seems that the robot has also a 45 degree angle with the global vertical axes (y axis). I would suggest the following: Check if the ...


1

You will have to do it as mentioned. However, if the 3D model is accurate, there is only one number you have to find. Choose any dimension you can measure on both the real robot and the 3D model. $Scale=\frac{RealDimension}{3Ddimension}$ Every matching real and 3D dimension will give you the same number for scale. So once you calculate scale once, you ...


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