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I'm looking to find out, How do human-like legs compare to chicken legs and four-leg systems. In terms of cost, performance, speed, strength and accuracy.

I'm interested in things like speed, agility, turning radius, complexity and cost.

For a design large enough for a person to ride, rider fatigue is also important -- how do they compare in terms of achievable ride smoothness, vibration, and so on?

Are there quantitative benefits of 3 DOF hip joints, compared to 2 DOF?

I realize other factors will come into play as well, such as actuators, joint designs and control systems. However, my interest at the moment is how basic leg designs compare to one another.

Edit: I'm looking for someone who has used these mechanisms first hand.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to robotics Sinpwnzorz, but I'm afraid questions like this really aren't a good fit for a stack exchange site. We prefer practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face, so Your questions should be reasonably scoped. If you can imagine an entire book that answers your question, you’re asking too much. Take a look at How to Ask and tour for more information on how stack exchange works. $\endgroup$
    – Mark Booth
    Jun 7, 2016 at 15:13

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Google "strandbeest"

I got the perportions in the photograph from a robotic toy. These legs move very smoothly and would make for a comfortable ride.

The numbers are from counting the holes in the toy's construction beams. The drawing is one half of one side of the toy with another mirror image leg to the right. The circle the left is a pivot and the circle on the right is a crank with a radios of three holes.

For a smooth ride you need to have four legs on each side with the same fixed and moving points with 2 pairs of 2 legs on each side driven 180 degrees from each other at the moving point.

Good luck. I could not post the picture so email me for the picture.

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  • $\begingroup$ No, what I'm looking for is someone who has experience with the robotics aspect of working with bipedal or quadruped systems. The strandbeest isn't anywhere near what I'm looking for. I've got the design, I need some pros and cons about the designs. And I've finished all of the speculation so now I need proof. $\endgroup$
    – Sinpwnzorz
    May 29, 2016 at 9:28
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For a design large enough for a person to ride, rider fatigue is also important -- how do they compare in terms of achievable ride smoothness, vibration, and so on?

Current and past designs tend to be pretty slow.

My vote is for chicken legs...

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  • $\begingroup$ That is what I am looking to find out, by finding someone with hands-on experience. $\endgroup$
    – Sinpwnzorz
    May 29, 2016 at 9:29
  • $\begingroup$ Very general questions like yours usually get closed for not being specific enough. You are more likely to get a response if you narrow your question (how basic leg designs compare to one another, or even more specific). $\endgroup$
    – hauptmech
    May 29, 2016 at 10:52
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, I edited the OP. I'm really just looking to talk with someone who's done this. Not sure how else to find that person. $\endgroup$
    – Sinpwnzorz
    May 29, 2016 at 15:49
  • $\begingroup$ robotics.stackexchange is not the right place. Do a little homework and find the research lab closest to your interest. Send the researcher an email. Be clear about your goals and intentions. You should get a response. $\endgroup$
    – hauptmech
    May 29, 2016 at 21:43
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    $\begingroup$ It's unlikely you will find someone who really knows what they are doing on a forum. Seach for what you are interested in on scholar.google, you will find names of people who are experts in what you are interested in. "quadruped robot research" "walking robot research" etc will help you find labs. Send them an email. Be a bit more detailed than you were here and make sure tell them a little bit about yourself and why you are interested in. If you are a student wanting to learn about or join the field you will get a reply. $\endgroup$
    – hauptmech
    May 29, 2016 at 23:02

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