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so i'm really interested in robotics.. I'm not really a robot expert as i have no experience on creating one. I just like them. Anyway, I am always wondering if its possible to build a robot that can transfer itself to different devices and still function. I mean, if you want that robot to transfer itself(THE DATA that making it function or whatever you call it) to your laptop so you can still use it while you are away or anything.. Does creating one require advanced computing and knowledge? Is it kind of creating a artificial intelligence?. When it think of this i would always thought of J.A.R.V.I.S since he can go to Stark Suit and communicate with him.

Translated into robotics terminology by a roboticist:

Is it possible to create software for controlling robot hardware that can transfer itself to different devices and still function. Could it transfer itself to your laptop and collaborate with you using information it gathered while it was in it's robot body? Does creating software like this require advanced knowledge and computing? Is software like this considered to be artificial intelligence?

I am serious about this question sorry to bother or if anyone will be annoyed./

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closed as unclear what you're asking by Ben, Mark Booth Nov 30 '15 at 17:40

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • $\begingroup$ @heydue101, I'm going to edit your question title since it should actually ask the question! $\endgroup$ – Brian Lynch Nov 28 '15 at 16:49
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This already happens when a commercial robot product comes off of the assembly line! The robot software is the same for each robot and is copied over.

Some robots work using similar computer processors as your laptop so you could just copy the files over and use them in a simulator of some kind. Many of us use ROS (Robot Operating System), which is useful for code that works on multiple different robots.

However, you usually want a robot to perform very specific tasks, and the robot itself will typically have a physical configuration that doesn't change. That doesn't mean you can't develop systems that work with various configurations. There are examples of modular robots that can reconfigure themselves -- and this means software or AI that can handle varying configurations. Here is one example that builds new robots out of foam. This is kind of like the idea of cross-platform software that is intended to work on different devices.

It is just so much easier to make one reliable system for one robot such as a ground vehicle, and another entirely separate system that is reliable for flying a UAV. Trying to make one system that can control both of those vehicles equally well is very difficult, and in most cases it is not worth the risk and disadvantages.

Possibly what you are referring to is a general artificial intelligence that can "hack" into different systems and control them even though it is not designed for it. Otherwise it is just a matter of including various inputs and outputs as you want -- think of something like an automated building management system, controlling thermostats, elevators, door locks, etc., each one of those items is like a separate robot but they are all controlled by one central computer.

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The short answer is yes, totally possible, though not done that often in practice.

Creating an AI that thinks like a human (and does what it's human partners or masters want like J.A.R.V.I.S) is something we can't do yet. The current research in that direction does require advanced knowledge and skills.

If you want to know more about some detail add a comment about what you are curious about and I'll try to answer.

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