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I'm relatively new to robotics, and I'm building a project for which I need a simple wireless connection between two circuits such that when the first circuit is switched on, the other circuit gets switched on too. I'm looking to preferably build something like this on my own, but I have no idea about wireless connections. I only know basic wired robotics. I also know C++ programming if that helps. Apologies if such a question has already been asked.

Regards, Hanit Banga

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    $\begingroup$ Can you share some enviormental information about your setup: How far are the curcuits seperated? Is anything (wall, house) between those curcuits? This information are needed to evalute which wireless technology can be used. $\endgroup$ – TobiasK Jun 1 '15 at 10:22
  • $\begingroup$ It's a very basic project, the circuits will be no further apart than 2-3 metres with only air between them $\endgroup$ – Cerberus Jun 1 '15 at 10:25
  • $\begingroup$ Are the circuits fixed in place? $\endgroup$ – Scott Downey Jun 1 '15 at 11:00
  • $\begingroup$ Infra-red, radio-frequency, bluetooth or wifi. To start off, you might want to get a cabled connection working and then try to expand it to wireless. $\endgroup$ – Paul Jun 4 '15 at 7:31
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If the curcuits are placed stationary the most simplistic solution might be using an IR-Led and a reciever. Like the :
http://www.farnell.com/datasheets/1835437.pdf
http://wwwtest.vishay.com/docs/81007/tsal5100.pdf

Just powerup the Led. The reciever will recognize this light and switches the output.

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    $\begingroup$ +1 for basically what I was writing (you beat me to it!). There's also a goood tutorial about using IR with Arduino. $\endgroup$ – Chuck Jun 1 '15 at 12:12
  • $\begingroup$ That wouldn't work for me, as the circuits will not be stationary, but if nothing else, I'll try this as this seems to be simple enough. $\endgroup$ – Cerberus Jun 1 '15 at 12:58
  • $\begingroup$ The tutorial I linked to should work for you; the transmitter (LED) and receiver (IR sensor) don't have to be pointed directly at each other, just like your TV remote doesn't have to be pointed directly at your TV. They just need to be in the same room. $\endgroup$ – Chuck Jun 1 '15 at 15:39
  • $\begingroup$ If the curcuits are something like robots and moving around then IR-Communication might not be the best solution. Maybe I add another solution later $\endgroup$ – TobiasK Jun 2 '15 at 6:09
  • $\begingroup$ I think this will work if it is similar to TV remote, as one of the circuits will be completely stationary, while the other will move about a little, mostly changing orientation, not position. So I'll most probably go with this. Thanks for your help $\endgroup$ – Cerberus Jun 7 '15 at 15:45
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First of all do it with IR transmiter and receiver to develop your skills on signal buffering and processing. Than try to do it with fm or am transceiver circuits. Also you can use toy remote control devices 25MHz or 433 MHz.

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If you are looking for an implementation that would use a microcontroller, you can opt for RF which allows a much broader range of communication then IR can offer.

Sparfun offers some transmitters and recievers for use $4/5/ea.

Transmitter
Receiver

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  • $\begingroup$ In my opinion your approach might be an overkill for this requirement. Basically he needs to transmit only one bit. $\endgroup$ – TobiasK Jun 4 '15 at 10:35

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