3
$\begingroup$

I read up on the wheels of Curiosity, and also about the suspension. But is there a name for the steering? It looks similar in nature to the front landing gear on an airplane, but searching those terms didn't turn up and answer. I've attached a picture with the area of interest highlighted.

(Image: Gene Blevins/Reuters)

enter image description here

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

Rocker-bogie is the suspension. The steering is Ackermann.

Ackermann steering geometry

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Ah, ok. Steering is not based on how the wheel itself is actuated, it's based on how the wheels, and how many wheels, contribute to the vehicle turning. $\endgroup$ – Matt Brown Jan 30 '15 at 0:53
  • $\begingroup$ Correct. Akerman came around to solve a ratio problem (the angle is not the same for both wheels). But this is just doing it electrically instead of mechanically. And it can even consider all 4 corners as well :) $\endgroup$ – Spiked3 Jan 30 '15 at 2:15
  • $\begingroup$ I believe that "Ackerman" refers only to the mechanism that's used in cars. There is no other way to steer (without skidding) than by aligning all the wheels toward the same point. $\endgroup$ – Ian Feb 5 '15 at 16:23
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, I agree. The mars rocker bogie mimics mechanical ackerman electrically, and at all corners. I didn't want to confuse a simplistic explanation. And it is actually not aligned to the same point, it represents the best slip angle of two different diameter circles as far as I know. $\endgroup$ – Spiked3 Feb 5 '15 at 18:09
2
$\begingroup$

The wheels simply pivot. In terms of the mechanism, they've just placed the center of rotation for the wheel's steering through the center point of the wheel itself. There is no special name for this; the practice of steering just means that all the wheels are oriented toward a single point.

The actuation is done by 10 servo motors, one per wheel for driving and one per corner-wheel for steering.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.