0
$\begingroup$

Rosanswers logo

ubuntu 12.04 and fuerte

How to use rxplot to plot the transforms? They have the position and orientation.

Example

header: seq: 0 stamp: secs: 1311867210 nsecs: 774027961 frame_id: /world child_frame_id: /kinect transform: translation: x: 0.208460861206 y: -1.06889804077 z: 1.87455181885 rotation: x: -0.0425775370706 y: -0.0287192089576 z: 0.77849649613 w: 0.625544215773


Originally posted by sai on ROS Answers with karma: 1935 on 2013-03-20

Post score: 2

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

0
$\begingroup$

Rosanswers logo

In my opinion, rxplot is not the best tool at plotting tf's. I would recommend you to use rviz for that.

If you want to see x, y and z positions and orientations maybe you should consider using an odometry or pose topic parsed from the node tf or something similar, in order to avoid what Adolfo Rodríguez comments.


Originally posted by Miquel Massot with karma: 1471 on 2013-03-20

This answer was ACCEPTED on the original site

Post score: 3


Original comments

Comment by Adolfo Rodriguez T on 2013-04-03:
There is no "best tool", as the goodness measure depends a lot on your requirements. Rviz excels at visualizing instantaneous frame configurations, but if you're interested in visualizing time series a plotting tool might be more appropriate.

Comment by Adolfo Rodriguez T on 2013-04-03:
...additionally the details of a specific implementation can make your life easier or harder. Plotting a /tf time series with rxplot/rqt has its difficulties, but plotting a pose_stamped topic is straightforward. YMMV...

$\endgroup$
0
$\begingroup$

Rosanswers logo

The following snippet will print the x coordinate of the first transform in a tf message:

rxplot /tf/transforms[0]/transform/translation/x

Big caveat: if there are multiple publishers of the /tf topic, this won't work, as the transform vector index (the [0] above) will not always represent the same frame. Further, f you're querying a nonzero index, it might be possible that the index does not even exist in a given message.

I would recommend republishing the transform(s) of interest as a separate pose(stamped) message and plot from there. More overhead, but less surprises.


Originally posted by Adolfo Rodriguez T with karma: 3907 on 2013-03-20

This answer was NOT ACCEPTED on the original site

Post score: 2

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.