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I have just sized the DC motors I want to use (corresponding to my robot and its intended applications - my figures include a 50% uncertainty factor to account for friction in reducers and other losses). Now I need to actually choose the exact motors I want to buy from the manufacturer (I am targeting maxon motors as I am not an expert and want no problem). I have a few down to earth questions about linking the mechanical needs to the electrical characteristics, among them:

Question #4:

The motor I chose (maxon brushed DC: 310005 found here) has nominal speed = 7630rpm - nominal torque = 51.6mNm. My needs are max speed = 50.42rpm / max torque = 10620 mNm. This means a reduction factor of 151 for speed and 206 for torque. Should I choose a gear closer to 151 or 206?

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If you choose 151 you'll get the speed but won't get the torque, if you choose 206 you'll get the torque but won't get the speed. You can either play with your needs to be able to use that motor or use another higher torque/speed motor.

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You have to select the motor for the worst case. (Assuming you cannot change your specification) it just may turn out that you have excess of speed or an excess of torque. In your example you have selected a motor that only handles the best case. You need a larger motor. (or to reduce your specification or to reduce your safety factor.)

My preference would be to have available more torque than required by specification as you really should NEVER stall a motor.

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