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I bought 2 brushed motor controllers from China to use with my hobby-weight battle robot (http://www.banggood.com/ESC-Brushed-Speed-Controller-For-RC-Car-Truck-Boat-320A-7_2V-16V-p-915276.html).

These are intended for use with my 2 cordless drill motors which will be driving the left and right wheel respectively. The robot will therefore be steered in "tank mode" by varying the speed and direction of rotation of the 2 motors using the two joysticks on my Turnigy 9x transmitter.

My question is: I have seen videos on youtube where people calibrate brushless motor controllers (ESCs) using some system of pushing the joystick on a standard transmitter forward and listening to tones and then doing the same for reverse and so on.

However when I asked the suppliers about a similar procedure for these brushed controllers, all they could say is that they did not need calibration. The exact words were "It seems that you're talking about transmitter for copters,but this ESC is for RC car or boat. You pull the trigger, it goes forward, you push the trigger, it reverse. And you don't need to calibrate it, just plug it, then it can work."

My transmitter is not one of those gun shaped ones used for cars. So am I in trouble with these controllers or should they work correctly out of the box as the supplier seems to be implying?

You may fairly ask why have I not just tried this out and the simple answer is that my LIPO charger has not yet arrived and I therefore cannot power anything up as yet.

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The calibration in other ESCs is used to compensate for different ranges of the input that different transmitters/receivers produce -- if you push the throttle all the way forward, your system will generate some width of PWM pulses. This might not be identical to full throttle on other system, so you can calibrate to use the full range of the ESC.

It should definitely not be critical to calibrate the range.

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