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I bought E6C3 AG5C, here, for my project. My project is indoor robot localization using encoders and IMU. From its datasheet it has 13 wires, black and red wires are for ground and source and 10 are for pulses of different resolutions. The brown wire give 256 PPR at 8 bit. With the combination of any pulse wire with brown wire shows no difference to differentiate the clockwise or anticlockwise wheel direction as all encoders do.

I have tried the method that on clockwise when one pulse is rising the other will fall (i.e. high/low) and on anticlockwise when one pulse is rising the other will be the opposite of the previous one means that there is a phase difference between them.

If there is another method available then please inform me with this.

Pulses

I just need to know if this is used for both clockwise and anticlockwise motion detection just like common encoders do, as common encoders have three pulse wires in which they have same resolution but with phase difference to ensure clockwise and anticlockwise motion detection.

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  • $\begingroup$ @jsotola - Could you please post that as an answer? Partial answers, or answers you aren't confident about should still be posted as answers, since they can be improved by future edits. Comments should be considered ephemeral, any comment which no longer actively helps to improve a question or answer may be deleted at any time to tidy up a post. $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Jun 12, 2023 at 14:14

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That's an absolute encoder.

It outputs a 10 bit number that corresponds to the angle of rotation and does not require power to "remember" its position.

The microcontroller has to monitor the output value and determine if the value is increasing or decreasing.

You could monitor only the lower few bits.

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It is an absolute encoder. You read a series of bits to determine the rotation of the shaft. What will confuse people is that the output is in gray code, not simply binary. Gray code is a minimal change code where only 1 bit changes at a time. In normal binary you count 001, 010, 011, 100, 101, 110, 111, and so on. As you can see several bits may change at the same time. When counting from 011 to 100, there is a chance you might read the some of the bits in one scan and the other bits in a later scan, showing you 000 or 111 instead of 100. Gray code counts differently, 000, 001, 011, 010, 110, and so on. Only 1 of the bits change with each count.

You should read all of the bits, convert the gray code to binary, and if counting up, you are going clock wise, it counting down counter clock wise. Make sure to account for the roll over back to the starting value of 0.

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