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If you have two position estimates $P_{t_1}$ and $P_{t_2}$ and times $t_1$ and $t_2$ how do you extract the average angular velocity from them? The linear velocity is a simple difference but how do you compute angular velocity?

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  • $\begingroup$ As the answer from @robotsfoundme indicates, it would be helpful to expand on what the Ps are. As it is now, the term 'position' can be interpreted as 2 or 3D vectors without orientation information. 'pose estimates' may be clearer, but even better to specify exactly the quantities you are working with: roll, pitch, yaw, or rotation matrix or quaternions? One can be converted into the other, but there may be specific methods for each. $\endgroup$
    – sgvd
    Nov 22, 2022 at 21:09
  • $\begingroup$ Lets assume Euler angles or a rotation matrix but I am reading up on Quaternions. $\endgroup$ Nov 23, 2022 at 3:43

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Clarifying the question

The question needs more clarity. For example, you need to explain the positions are of what, with respect to what, resolve in which frame.

Let's assume the positions $P_{t_{1}}$ and $P_{t_{2}}$ are positions of some arbitrary point $b$ on the robot/body, with respect to an arbitrary point $a$ in the world (e.g., origin of the map). Furthermore, let's assume the positions are resolved in the world frame $\mathcal{F}_{w}$. The position of the robot/body $b$ with respect to the point $a$ at time $t$, resolved in the world frame $\mathcal{F}_{w}$ can then be described as $\mathbf{r}^{b_{t_1}a}_{w}$ and $\mathbf{r}^{b_{t_2}a}_{w}$.

Angular velocity from a motion model

The angular velocity describes the rate of change of frames, and not of points. Thus, asking for the angular velocity from two points is an ill-posed question. Perhaps what you meant to be asking is the angular velocity of a rigid body, which has a reference frame, given the rigid body's position.

To compute the angular velocity of a rigid body given it's position requires using its motion model. The motion model is usually in the form $$ \begin{align} \mathbf{x}_{k} &= \mathbf{f}(\mathbf{x}_{k-1}, \mathbf{u}_{k-1}), \end{align} $$ where $\mathbf{x}_{k}$ is the state and $\mathbf{u}_{k}$ is the control input at time $t_{k}$, which may include the angular velocity. Thus, computing the angular velocity would require computing $\mathbf{u}_{k-1}$ from $\mathbf{x}_{k-1}$ and $\mathbf{x}_{k}$. If $\mathbf{f}$ is invertible, then the control-input is computed using $$ \mathbf{u}_{k-1} = \mathbf{f}^{-1}(\mathbf{x}_{k}, \mathbf{k-1}). $$

Let's consider a 2D rigid body example, where the state is the robot's displacements $\mathbf{r}^{b_{k}a}_{w}$ and its heading $\theta_{k}$ at time $t_{k}$. This state can be "nicely" described using the special Euclidean group $SE(2)$ (check Sola - A Micro Lie Theory for more info on Lie groups for robotics): $$ \begin{align} \mathbf{T} &= \begin{bmatrix} \cos(\theta) & -\sin(\theta) & x \\ \sin(\theta) & \cos(\theta) & y \\ 0 & 0 & 1 \end{bmatrix} = \begin{bmatrix} \mathbf{C}(\theta) & \mathbf{r}^{ba}_{w} \\ \mathbf{0} & 1 \end{bmatrix} \in SE(2). \end{align} $$ Let the control inputs be the linear velocity of the robot resolved in the body frame $\mathbf{v}^{b_{k}a}_{b_{k}}$ and the angular velocity $\omega^{b_{k}w}$. The motion model is then $$ \mathbf{T}_{k} = \mathbf{T}_{k-1} \begin{bmatrix} \mathbf{C}(\Delta t_{k-1} \omega^{b_{k-1}w}) & \Delta t_{k-1} \mathbf{v}^{b_{k-1}a}_{b_{k-1}} \\ \mathbf{0} & 1 \end{bmatrix}, $$ where $\Delta t_{k-1} = t_{k} - t_{k-1}$ is the sampling period and $\mathbf{C}(\cdot)\in SO(2)$ is the rotation matrix constructed from $\Delta t \omega^{b_{k-1}w}$.

Going back to the original question, if you have the full states at times $t_{k}$ and $t_{k-1}$, which include the displacements and headings, then the angular velocity can be computed using $$ \begin{bmatrix} \mathbf{C}(\Delta t_{k-1} \omega^{b_{k-1}w}) & \Delta t_{k-1} \mathbf{v}^{b_{k-1}a}_{b_{k-1}} \\ \mathbf{0} & 1 \end{bmatrix} = \mathbf{T}_{k-1}^{-1}\mathbf{T}_{k}. $$

Note on computing arbitrary points

The kinematic motion model presented above may not be applicable for your application. For example, if the point $b$ is not exactly on top of the robot wheel (for the $SE(2)$ example above), then the kinematic equation would probably be slightly different, so you'll need to derive the kinematic equation for that model.

Note on non-invertible motion models

If the motion model is not invertible, then perhaps using (nonlinear) least squares is your best bet. Nonlinear least squares is the basis of some estimation algorithms such as the (extended) Kalman filter. For example, this approach would be applicable if you're trying to estimate the angular velocity using position estimates from a GPS. In such case, you need at least an initial guess of the heading. Otherwise, the problem would be non-observable.

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  • $\begingroup$ This makes sense, I didn't think about the motion model aspect of it which would imply the linear interpolation. In my case it's 3 position 3 orientation dimensions but the same idea applies. This is WRT the center of mass of the body. $\endgroup$ Nov 24, 2022 at 7:32
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You don't

In order to have an angular velocity, you have to be able to show that there is an arc in the trajectory. Representing arcs requires 3 points on the trajectory, and you only have 2. You need 1 more point or one more piece of information to get the angular velocity.

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  • $\begingroup$ What? You have a 6 dof position vector for each position, there should be a way using linear interpolation to estimate the transformation between the two poses right> $\endgroup$ Nov 22, 2022 at 3:02
  • $\begingroup$ As the accepted answer identified, there aren't enough details in the question to answer properly. I answered with the minimal information available at the time. In the general sense, you are correct @FourierFlux. $\endgroup$ Nov 30, 2022 at 14:41

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