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I'm trying to understand the dynamics (torque , velocity, etc ) of how a simple 2 DoF robotic arm rotates. I am using the RoboAnalyzer simulator 1 .

It has a Inverse Dynamics setting of "Free" or "Forced" Torque. You select "Free" or "Forced".

What doe that mean ? What gets changed if that setting is changed ?

Many thanks

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Robotics agribot, but I'm afraid that questions which can only be answered by the technical support team for a specific software package aren't a good fit for a stack exchange site. Practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face are always welcome here though, so if you edit your question to fit our community guidelines we can reopen it for you. Please take a look at How to Ask and tour for more information on how stack exchange works. $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Aug 24, 2022 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ Try contacting the authors of the software. $\endgroup$
    – Ben
    Aug 24, 2022 at 14:38

1 Answer 1

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Free torque is a torque that is applied to a joint without any external load or resistance. This type of torque is used to model the behavior of a joint that is moving freely, such as an arm swinging back and forth with no external forces acting upon it. In a robot simulation, free torque may be used to test the limits of a joint's range of motion or to evaluate the performance of a control algorithm in the absence of external disturbances.

Forced torque, on the other hand, is a torque that is applied to a joint in response to an external load or disturbance. This type of torque is used to model the behavior of a joint that is interacting with its environment, such as a robot arm lifting a heavy object or pushing against an obstacle. In a robot simulation, forced torque may be used to test the ability of a robot to handle different types of loads or to evaluate the effectiveness of a control algorithm in the presence of external disturbances.

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