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In the interest of soft robotics I need a high power programmable battery power supply. I also found this.

https://aip.scitation.org/doi/pdf/10.1063/1.2362721

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Robotics markbunting, but I'm afraid that shopping questions really aren't a good fit for a stack exchange site. We prefer practical, answerable questions based on actual problems that you face. Take a look at How to Ask and tour for more information on how stack exchange works, and the Robotics question checklist for details of how to write a good question. $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Commented Jul 16, 2021 at 12:43
  • $\begingroup$ Is it possible? Probably - just keep adding batteries in series until you get there. Is it useful? Probably not - what 100 kV-rated electronics are you going to use? You say you "need a high power programmable battery power supply," but power and voltage are two different concepts. $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Commented Jul 16, 2021 at 12:45
  • $\begingroup$ @Chuck I’m trying to build a soft robot humanoid android using HASEL actuators. How are power and voltage different and if I did make such a battery how long do you think it could run before needing to be charged? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 16, 2021 at 16:05
  • $\begingroup$ I would highly recommend taking some introductory courses on electricity. Power is the product of voltage and current. How long it will run depends on the energy capacity. Power is the change in energy over time. They're all related terms but independent; you can have a low-voltage, low-power application with a large capacity, like a bunch of D-cell batteries in a flashlight, or a low-voltage, high-power application with a low capacity, like a capacitor, or a high-voltage, low-power application with a low capacity, like a static electricity shock. Specifying one does not specify the others. $\endgroup$
    – Chuck
    Commented Jul 16, 2021 at 17:38

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They do not have 100kV batteries. They use 12-volt batteries to power a fancy dc-dc converter, which steps up the voltage to 100kV with a Cockroft-Walton voltage multiplier. Ref: the abstract of the article you cite.

EDIT (response to comment): I read the material at artimusrobotics.com and read two of their papers in Science. Those Colorado guys are clever, but they're fighting the classic battle of high-voltage electrostatics vs high-current electromagnetics. From this I conclude that HASEL is not practical for operating a human-size bipedal robot, at least not this decade.

Use ordinary electric motors instead. Read about the actuators developed for the MIT Mini Cheetah.

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  • $\begingroup$ Do you think it’s practical to power up a humanoid android that could one day be bipedal using HASEL actuators? If not what do you think is my best route? $\endgroup$ Commented Jul 16, 2021 at 0:04

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