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How can I measure the amount of voltage I'm giving a servo motor? How can I give a servo motor the correct amount of power it needs to run at it's full potential? Say I had this motor:

ANNIMOS 60KG Digital Servo 8.4V High Voltage Stainless Steel Gear Large Torque High Speed Waterproof Baja Servos - 180 Degrees (this is an example that I copied from amazon)

What does the 60KG mean? I assume that 8.4V High Voltage is the amount of power it needs to run at full potential. Large torque means it can lift a lot of weight, but how much?

I've tried to find answers to these questions, I've watched a lot of YouTube videos and read a lot of tutorials, but I found nothing about my questions. Thank you for taking the time to read through this!

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That's a hobby servo, from a dubious source. It's not a technical device marketed to technical people, so don't expect a datasheet that has technical, verifiable specifications.

There are hobby servos that come with specifications, and sometimes they even meet their claims. If you want to buy one and have it Just Work, start with a company that lists said specifications, and that has a reputation for standing behind their work.

What does the 60KG mean?

It's very possibly a model name. Servos produce torque, and a kilogram is a unit of mass. Even when misused as a unit of force (i.e., $\mathrm {kg} \cdot 9.8\mathrm{m/s}$ it's still not a torque.

I assume that 8.4V High Voltage is the amount of power it needs to run at full potential.

If it were a technical specification, $\mathrm{8.4V}$ would be enough. "High voltage" just indicates that it uses more than the old-style 4-cell Nicad pack (4.8V nominal, essentially between 4V and 5V).

Assuming that it's a quality part, "$\mathrm{8.4V}$" almost certainly means that it's designed to run off of two unregulated Lithium-Polymer batteries in series. But you're buying a no-name part from an unreliable vendor.

Large torque means it can lift a lot of weight, but how much?

"Large" is a marketing word, designed to make stop thinking long enough to buy the thing. A real specification would list a torque in inch-pounds or Newton-meters. A better specification would have short-term torque and holding torque (but you won't find that in a hobby servo from any source).

"Large" torque means it can twist hard. Force = torque / diameter, so large torque means nothing in terms of how much weight it can lift unless you specify a lever arm.

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