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The Arduino turns off when I try to put the wire from the servo to its respective pin (9). Also, I've tried the code from the Arduino IDE, the knob code where the position of the motor depends on the value of the potentiometer. I don't really know what's wrong. Every time the servo tries to turn, the Arduino turns off, so the motor only turn for a very small degree, then the Arduino turns on, and so on.

By the way, I'm using an MG996R Tower Pro Digital Servo motor.

Is there a problem with the motor or/and the Arduino? I can't seem to remedy this problem.

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Arduino:SE. My guess is that you're trying to power the servo from the Arduino? $\endgroup$ – sempaiscuba Sep 2 '18 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ Well, yes. I attached the signal wire to pin 9 or arduino, then the Vcc and ground of the motor to the arduino's Vcc and ground. $\endgroup$ – Lorenz David Sep 2 '18 at 14:51
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It sounds like you are drawing too much power from the Arduino, and causing it to reset. Try powering your servo from a separate power source.

The Arduino Playground has a useful page on Arduino Pin Current Limitations which you might find helpful if you're designing robots that use Arduinos.


A summary of the information for the Arduino Uno is given below:

  • Input Voltage Limits:

  • Recommended: 7~12V

  • Absolute: 6~20V
  • Input/Output (I/O) pins: -0.5V to +5.5V (the actual max is “Vcc + 0.5V,” which for a 5V Arduino, is +5.5V)

  • Output Current Limits:

  • When powered by USB: total of 500mA
  • With external battery or power supply: total of 500mA~1A
  • 5V pin: same as above: 500mA or 500mA~1A
  • Each input/output pin: 40mA
  • Sum of all input/output pins combined (but NOT including the “5V” pin): 200mA
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  • $\begingroup$ Ohhh. So that's why. I think the Arduino is really resetting, realizing it just now. However, I've also tried powering the Servo motor with a separate source, a 9v source. Then the Arduino, from its Vin, there's a connected 9v battery too, it's a different battery. But the Arduino still resets. I wonder why. But the info you gave me helped a lot. $\endgroup$ – Lorenz David Sep 2 '18 at 15:08
  • $\begingroup$ May I ask, should they share the same ground? Or separate at all? $\endgroup$ – Lorenz David Sep 2 '18 at 15:09
  • $\begingroup$ As a general rule, you should always make sure your circuits have a common ground. $\endgroup$ – sempaiscuba Sep 2 '18 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ @LorenzDavid, don't use a regular 9V battery .... it consists of 6 AAAA cells, or is it AAAAA cells? ... hmmmm, low power any way you look at it .... try 6 AA cells in order to get more current $\endgroup$ – jsotola Sep 6 '18 at 2:22

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