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For a longer time I'm looking for some kind of robotic set, which is programmable, but most things I've found are related to child education or involves a lot of putting all the hardware parts together by yourself.

I'm working as a Software engineer for a longer time, so I have a good knowledge of software languages also on c/c++ .

I've taken several steps in on the Raspberry pi which was very interesting but shortly it turns out I'm not that much interested in soldering hardware parts or something like that.

Can you guys give me some advice on where to start with robotic Programming for adults, without getting to deep into elektronics or hardware engineering, if possible, but to conenctrate on Programming?

Any advice would be great

Thanks

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If you want to start programming a robot that's already built, the Scribbler 3 (S3) robot by Parallax, inc. is relatively affordable and comes already assembled. The programming relies on Blockly, a GUI-based programming language for robotics systems. I think it's popular in schools.

If you're interested in something a bit more robust, why not look into the iRobot Create® 2 Programmable Robot? It's built from remanufactured Roomba® platforms and comes preassembled. You could customize and program it (direct connection, Arduino, or RaspberryPi).

Finally, since you are already and experienced software engineer and are not interested in assembling hardware, you could look into Gazebo and MoveIt! which are two robot simulation system used in the industry (as far as I understand). They both offer a bridge to ROS the Robot Operating System.

I hope this helps!

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The Turtlebot 3 robots are designed to be ROS (Robot Operating System) reference implementations. There are two versions, the Burger and the Waffle. The Burger is the least expensive.

They are built of plastic pieces which need to be bolted together. They are very sturdy. It is also possible to use a 3d printer to make more pieces if you want a larger robot, and they have instructions for different types of robots if you don't want one with differential steering.

Dexter Industries sells a board that allows a Raspberry Pi to connect to Lego Mindstorms sensors and motors. This allows you to use a much more powerful computer to control robots using the Lego Mindstorms system.

And then are a number of systems from Vex Robotics. They might look like toys, but I put them a bit above the Lego Mindstorms in strength.

If you prefer metal, then Servo City has a number of kits and parts (including motors, motor controllers, beams, plates, hardware, wheels, etc.) to build robots, though generally you'll have to do your own electronics. I'm planning on using the electronics that came with my Turtlebot 3 robots with my tracked robot from ServoCity. Plus a bunch of other stuff I've collected.

One thing I suggest if you want to build less toy-like robots is a 3d printer. This can be useful to make parts that would be difficult or expensive to buy. YMMV, but I prefer the Original Prusa i3 MK3. Of course, I say that because it's what I'm used to.

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They are a little pricey, but you can do really cool things with the Lego Robotics stuff. You can run linux on the Ev3 bricks and then program it however you want. They have a lot of choices for motors/servos and sensors and everything plugs together pretty easily.

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