0
$\begingroup$

It is easy to understand how a robot can avoid obstacle if the goal point is not within the obstacle (Point A) as shown in the figure. But I'm curious how could a robot know that the the goal point is within the obstacle (Point B)? For example in an area exploration using random motion, the way-point is generated randomly. If the generated way-point located inside the obstacle, how could robot know? How to detect this problem?
enter image description here

$\endgroup$

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

The same obstacle detection and path planning approach that can get you from O to A should be able to also tell you that B is not reachable.

It will depend on the planning strategy for how this manifests. It should be able to say though that either every option has been exhausted (if that's finite and realistically achievable) or that it needs to give up after making a reasonable number of attempts. It may, therefore, not always be possible (or at least practical) to distinguish between B being fully inside an obstacle versus being surrounded by obstacles with only a very narrow opening between them.

$\endgroup$
0
1
$\begingroup$

You usually need to define the C-space of a robot. Configurations that don't belong to it, are not reachable

You could for example, introduce a robot in a room, close the door, and instruct it to reach a point outside. But, how would it know it can't be reached without having any extra information? Well, it would have to iterate through the whole room until it has mapped it completely and came to the conclusion that it is inside a closed boundary. Just like the person above me told you.

So, the best way to go is to map the obstacles and know which points are not reachable for a given state in your robot.

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Please note that "above" and "below", w.r.t. answers is not fixed and depends upon the votes and view preferences. It is better to either link to the answer or mention the poster's name. $\endgroup$ May 2 at 13:38

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.