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I am developing a line follower robot and I am not sure about how many motors should I use: two or four. I'm thinking of using four, but I do not know if it's worth it (it will let the car be heavier, consume more power...). Does anyone have an idea? I'm planning in use something like this design here, of Aniki Hirai: http://anikinonikki.cocolog-nifty.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/uncategorized/2014/11/19/cartsix04.jpg.

The engine I'll use is a micro-metal motor, from Pololu, just like in the link: https://www.pololu.com/product/3048.

I know the question is a little bit vague, but I don't know another way to ask this.

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  • $\begingroup$ Are you planning on having 2 motors per wheel, or 4 wheels? $\endgroup$ – Ben Feb 8 '17 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ I am planning on having 4 wheels (1 motor per wheel), but I accept changes about it. $\endgroup$ – Willian Lopes Feb 8 '17 at 18:24
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The best option would be to use two wheels. Then one motor for each wheel in total two. Then, you can use roller coaster at the front. You do not need to provide power to that. Just provide power to back two wheels. By varying the speed of two back wheels (differential drive) you can move straight and turn as well.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks @Bharat, I think it's exactly what I will do. One model of a line follower that I really like is this model of [anikinonikki] (anikinonikki.cocolog-nifty.com/.shared/image.html?/photos/…). I thought in doing something like his design, but using one motor per wheel instead of two wheels per motor. $\endgroup$ – Willian Lopes Feb 11 '17 at 19:44
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If you're using four traditional wheels (all have friction) you should power all of them (skid steer). Otherwise your robot has to drag the unpowered wheels when you turn. You can also over come this problem by using two unpowered frictionless wheels instead giving you differential steering.

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  • $\begingroup$ Just realized I assumed that your wheels could only turn on their axis and not pivot like a car's for example. I'll leave this answer up. $\endgroup$ – Xavier Guay Feb 10 '17 at 4:38

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