5 broken image fixed (click 'rendered output' to see the difference; image retrieved via Wayback Machine); for more info, see https://gist.github.com/Glorfindel83/9d954d34385d2ac2597bbe864466259f
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Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.pngA swimmer bot in the boodstream
(source: ethz.ch)

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream
(source: ethz.ch)

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

4 replaced http://robotics.stackexchange.com/ with https://robotics.stackexchange.com/
source | link

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

ricsrics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

3 Added a link to the linked to answer/
source | link

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

@ricsrics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a marsMars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

@rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

Yes! Yes we do have robots which can swim through the bloodstream!

rics did a good job of summarizing the difficulties in producing a completely autonomous nano robot. Something like a Mars rover, with more autonomy, but tiny. This is not the only type of robot. While this is definitely beyond the capabilities of our current-day researchers / engineers, there is another thread in this domain that is worth mentioning: nano manipulators.

Traditionally, robots have been automated manipulators. In the case of robotic manipulators, most of the processing and localization challenges are offloaded, and the robot just carries out the task of delivering part A to location B.

enter image description here

This closely matches the job description of a nano robot: deliver drug A to organ B, or take sample A, etc. In this case, a very small magnetic manipulator can be inserted into the body and moved, turned, etc, by use of magnetic fields from outside the body. So the robot ends up being a small piece of innocuous metal.

A swimmer bot in the boodstream http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/images/swimmer_robot.png

Think of it as the "hand." The magnetic fields are the "arms," an MRI is the "eyes," and a computer somewhere is the "brain." Its not fully embedded, but it is technically a nano-scale robotic manipulator.

If you are interested in this (who wouldn't be?) Check out the following. There are plenty of awesome videos ahead:

  • The key guy in this field is Brad Nelson. He gave a keynote talk at ICRA 2012, in Saint Paul, MN. It is available freely here. Have a look.

  • More information (including the above reference paper), can be found on his webpage, http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/index.php

  • One of the coolest takeaways from the talk was his work on "swimmer" robots. More info (and videos!) here: http://www.iris.ethz.ch/msrl/research/current/helical_swimmers/

  • There are two types of manipulators he is researching, but both are inserted, tracked using MRI, moved / manipulated using magnetic fields, and then removed via a simple needle.

  • The two types are based on size. A larger manipulator is easier to move using magnets, but a smaller one can be more precise.

My impression after the keynote talk was this technology is quickly approaching human trials. They have tested in cow eyes and other biological organs. I'm interested to see what they produce this year.

2 readability, removed one paragraph
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