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I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • EnergyPower, as you said. The amount of energy thatpower you use forneed to do a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwisepower, otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost).
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energypower (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movementWith processors, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on marsMars we can't trust martiansMartians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshipingworshipping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Power. The amount of power you need to do a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more power, otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost.
  • Computation Speed. The statement about power (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? With processors, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on Mars we can't trust Martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshipping it, which is totally not cool for us).

6 deleted 52 characters in body
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I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump http://autoblogcar.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Rhys-Millen-Hyundai-Veloster-Rally-Car-jumps.jpgcar jump

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump http://autoblogcar.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Rhys-Millen-Hyundai-Veloster-Rally-Car-jumps.jpg

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

5 added 183 characters in body
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I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the square of the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use fourtwo times more energy. Think E = 1/2 m v^2Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump http://autoblogcar.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Rhys-Millen-Hyundai-Veloster-Rally-Car-jumps.jpg

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the square of the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use four times more energy. Think E = 1/2 m v^2.
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump http://autoblogcar.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Rhys-Millen-Hyundai-Veloster-Rally-Car-jumps.jpg

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

I'm not such an expert in physics, but I can think of a few reasons:

  • Energy, as you said. The amount of energy that you use for a task is inversely proportional to the time it takes to do that task. So, if you do something twice as fast, you use two times more energy. Note: Like I said, I'm no physicist, so don't take my numbers too serious. However, I think it is well known that doing something faster requires more energy (otherwise you could do everything infinitely fast at no cost)
  • Computation Speed. The statement about energy (above) is not limited to movements. It is also true for computation. Have you noticed when your laptop is on power-saving mode, it runs slower? Similar to movement, if you compute something twice as fast, you need four times more energy to do it. As a result, most probably, the CPU of mars rovers are also not working at a high speed. Therefore, if the rover needs time to process something before moving on (for example images of the environment), it needs to move slower so it would receive data at a slower rate. Slow enough so that it can process them.
  • Stability. I believe I don't need to give you formulas for this phenomenon:

    car jump http://autoblogcar.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Rhys-Millen-Hyundai-Veloster-Rally-Car-jumps.jpg

    Simply put, the slower you go, the smaller the chance of lifting off over a ridge and possibly losing your stability when you land.

  • Maneuverability. If you go at a reasonably slow speed, you wouldn't have any trouble steering. On the other hand, at high speeds, you need larger curvature to turn, as well as more pressure on the wheels on the outer side.

Note that some of these issues, such as stability, are true for robots on earth too. However, here on earth we can always flip the vehicle if it turned over, but on mars we can't trust martians on it (they may like the rover stuck on its back and start worshiping it, which is totally not cool for us).

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