4 formatting, keep all images on separate line
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Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definitely room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out.

It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room.

The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice:   

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definitely room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out.

It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room.

The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice:  enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definitely room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out.

It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room.

The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice: 

enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

3 spelling fixes, and removed redundant "it spirals then traces the perimeter" explanations
source | link

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something. Then it, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just kinda bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definatlydefinitely room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

When HowStuffWorks tried it out, we found that Roomba starts cleaning in an outward-moving spiral and then heads for the perimeter of the room. Once it hits an obstacle, it believes it has reached the perimeter of the room. It then cleans along the "perimeter" until it hits another obstacle, at which point it cleans around it, finds a clear path and proceeds to traverse the room between objects like walls and furniture until the allotted cleaning time is up. The idea appears to be that if it cleans for a certain amount of time, it'll cover the whole floor, but whether it actually achieves complete floor coverage is pretty much hit or miss.

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

Our robot computes its algorithm 67 times every second, constantly stitching together information about its environment and recomputing its path. When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. 

It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. 

The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something. Then it does a perimeter sweep. Then it just kinda bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definatly room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

When HowStuffWorks tried it out, we found that Roomba starts cleaning in an outward-moving spiral and then heads for the perimeter of the room. Once it hits an obstacle, it believes it has reached the perimeter of the room. It then cleans along the "perimeter" until it hits another obstacle, at which point it cleans around it, finds a clear path and proceeds to traverse the room between objects like walls and furniture until the allotted cleaning time is up. The idea appears to be that if it cleans for a certain amount of time, it'll cover the whole floor, but whether it actually achieves complete floor coverage is pretty much hit or miss.

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

Our robot computes its algorithm 67 times every second, constantly stitching together information about its environment and recomputing its path. When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something, then does a perimeter sweep. Then it just bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definitely room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. 

It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. 

The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice: enter image description here enter image description here enter image description here

2 shrunk images that were not the main focus of the answer
source | link

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something. Then it does a perimeter sweep. Then it just kinda bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definatly room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

When HowStuffWorks tried it out, we found that Roomba starts cleaning in an outward-moving spiral and then heads for the perimeter of the room. Once it hits an obstacle, it believes it has reached the perimeter of the room. It then cleans along the "perimeter" until it hits another obstacle, at which point it cleans around it, finds a clear path and proceeds to traverse the room between objects like walls and furniture until the allotted cleaning time is up. The idea appears to be that if it cleans for a certain amount of time, it'll cover the whole floor, but whether it actually achieves complete floor coverage is pretty much hit or miss.

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

Our robot computes its algorithm 67 times every second, constantly stitching together information about its environment and recomputing its path. When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

And here are some prettySome long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them doing their thingillustrate how it works in practice:

   enter image description hereenter image description here

   enter image description hereenter image description here

   enter image description hereenter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something. Then it does a perimeter sweep. Then it just kinda bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definatly room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

When HowStuffWorks tried it out, we found that Roomba starts cleaning in an outward-moving spiral and then heads for the perimeter of the room. Once it hits an obstacle, it believes it has reached the perimeter of the room. It then cleans along the "perimeter" until it hits another obstacle, at which point it cleans around it, finds a clear path and proceeds to traverse the room between objects like walls and furniture until the allotted cleaning time is up. The idea appears to be that if it cleans for a certain amount of time, it'll cover the whole floor, but whether it actually achieves complete floor coverage is pretty much hit or miss.

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

Our robot computes its algorithm 67 times every second, constantly stitching together information about its environment and recomputing its path. When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

And here are some pretty long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them doing their thing:

 enter image description here

 enter image description here

 enter image description here

Roomba starts in a spiral until it hits something. Then it does a perimeter sweep. Then it just kinda bounces around. Roomba being the de facto standard in household robotic vaccum cleaners, I guess you could call it the "accepted solution". But from personal experience (I own two), there is definatly room for improvement.

From How Stuff Works:

When HowStuffWorks tried it out, we found that Roomba starts cleaning in an outward-moving spiral and then heads for the perimeter of the room. Once it hits an obstacle, it believes it has reached the perimeter of the room. It then cleans along the "perimeter" until it hits another obstacle, at which point it cleans around it, finds a clear path and proceeds to traverse the room between objects like walls and furniture until the allotted cleaning time is up. The idea appears to be that if it cleans for a certain amount of time, it'll cover the whole floor, but whether it actually achieves complete floor coverage is pretty much hit or miss.

algorithm

From an interview with Nancy Dussault Smith, Vice President of Marketing Communications at iRobot:

Our robot computes its algorithm 67 times every second, constantly stitching together information about its environment and recomputing its path. When it starts you’ll notice a spiral pattern, it’ll spiral out over a larger and larger area until it hits an object. When it finds an object, it will follow along the edge of that object for a period of time, and then it will start cris-crossing, trying to figure out the largest distance it can go without hitting another object, and that’s helping it figure out how large the space is, but if it goes for too long a period of time without hitting a wall, it’s going to start spiraling again, because it figures it’s in a wide open space, and it’s constantly calculating and figuring that out. It’s similar with the dirt sensors underneath, when one of those sensors gets tripped it changes its behaviors to cover that area. It will then go off in search of another dirty area in a straight path. The way that these different patterns pile on to each other as they go, we know that that is the most effective way to cover a room. The patterns that we chose and how the algorithm was originally developed was based off of behavior-based algorithms born out of MIT studying animals and how they go about searching areas for food. When you look at how ants and bees go out and they search areas, these kinds of coverage and figuring all of that out comes from that research. It’s not exact, obviously, I’m not saying we’re honeybees, but it’s that understanding of how to search out an area in nature that is the basis behind how our adaptive technology is developed.

Some long exposure pics of Roombas with LEDs on them illustrate how it works in practice:  enter image description here  enter image description here  enter image description here

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