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There are probably some very strong theoretical results about the sampling frequency required to control a system. In the absence of a better answer, I have:

When considering sample rate from a scientific or mathematical perspective, the guidelines are a bit more involved and beyond the scope of this blog post. Still, it’s generally accepted best-practice for the sample rate to be based on frequency or time-based components of the process data. Basic formulas propose the use of data that is either 5-10 times faster than the Process Time Constant or 3-5 times faster than the Process Dead-Time.

There's a couple of links in the quote to define process time constant and process dead time.

In general, faster is probably better. If you state significantly changes on the order of milliseconds, then you should provide control updates faster than that. In my experience (ground and maritime robotics), 10Hz has usually been sufficient.

There are probably some very strong theoretical results about the sampling frequency required to control a system. In the absence of a better answer, I have:

When considering sample rate from a scientific or mathematical perspective, the guidelines are a bit more involved and beyond the scope of this blog post. Still, it’s generally accepted best-practice for the sample rate to be based on frequency or time-based components of the process data. Basic formulas propose the use of data that is either 5-10 times faster than the Process Time Constant or 3-5 times faster than the Process Dead-Time.

There's a couple of links in the quote to define process time constant and process dead time.

In general, faster is probably better. If you state significantly changes on the order of milliseconds, then you should provide control updates faster than that.

There are probably some very strong theoretical results about the sampling frequency required to control a system. In the absence of a better answer, I have:

When considering sample rate from a scientific or mathematical perspective, the guidelines are a bit more involved and beyond the scope of this blog post. Still, it’s generally accepted best-practice for the sample rate to be based on frequency or time-based components of the process data. Basic formulas propose the use of data that is either 5-10 times faster than the Process Time Constant or 3-5 times faster than the Process Dead-Time.

There's a couple of links in the quote to define process time constant and process dead time.

In general, faster is probably better. If you state significantly changes on the order of milliseconds, then you should provide control updates faster than that. In my experience (ground and maritime robotics), 10Hz has usually been sufficient.

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source | link

There are probably some very strong theoretical results about the sampling frequency required to control a system. In the absence of a better answer, I have:

When considering sample rate from a scientific or mathematical perspective, the guidelines are a bit more involved and beyond the scope of this blog post. Still, it’s generally accepted best-practice for the sample rate to be based on frequency or time-based components of the process data. Basic formulas propose the use of data that is either 5-10 times faster than the Process Time Constant or 3-5 times faster than the Process Dead-Time.

There's a couple of links in the quote to define process time constant and process dead time.

In general, faster is probably better. If you state significantly changes on the order of milliseconds, then you should provide control updates faster than that.