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I think you could use bearing (or azimuth or right ascension) and mark (or altitude or declination). For example 0 mark 0 is straight ahead and on the horizon. 30 mark 30 is 30 degrees to the right and 30 degrees above the horizon. -90 mark -90 would be 90 degrees to the left and then face down into the ground. These could be relative to your current position and orientation or relative to some reference such as true north or magnetic north and the horizon. I'm not sure how standard this method is, but it serves a purpose and

This is generally quick for a human to approximate (and learn) and potentially accurate when measured preciselythe system astronomer's use.

I think you could use bearing and mark. For example 0 mark 0 is straight ahead and on the horizon. 30 mark 30 is 30 degrees to the right and 30 degrees above the horizon. -90 mark -90 would be 90 degrees to the left and then face down into the ground. These could be relative to your current position and orientation or relative to some reference such as true north or magnetic north and the horizon. I'm not sure how standard this method is, but it serves a purpose and is generally quick for a human to approximate (and learn) and potentially accurate when measured precisely.

I think you could use bearing (or azimuth or right ascension) and mark (or altitude or declination). For example 0 mark 0 is straight ahead and on the horizon. 30 mark 30 is 30 degrees to the right and 30 degrees above the horizon. -90 mark -90 would be 90 degrees to the left and then face down into the ground. These could be relative to your current position and orientation or relative to some reference such as true north or magnetic north and the horizon.

This is the system astronomer's use.

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I think you could use bearing and mark. For example 0 mark 0 is straight ahead and on the horizon. 30 mark 30 is 30 degrees to the right and 30 degrees above the horizon. -90 mark -90 would be 90 degrees to the left and then face down into the ground. These could be relative to your current position and orientation or relative to some reference such as true north or magnetic north and the horizon. I'm not sure how standard this method is, but it serves a purpose and is generally quick for a human to approximate (and learn) and potentially accurate when measured precisely.